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Rotten core on forward deck, how would you fix it?

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  • Rotten core on forward deck, how would you fix it?

    **Note - not a Mako but similar design and build construction**

    My boat is a 1987 and someone poorly sealed a pie plate on the forward deck of my boat. Unfortunately this has lead to a good amount of rot that extends outward of the pie plate at least 6" in almost all directions. 6" is as far as I can reach with the tools I had without cutting into the deck.

    The pie plate leads to a decent size storage area. I'm thinking about ordering (or making) this trapezoid hatch and installing it into the deck where this pie plate was. This would give me better access to that storage area and allow me to cut out more of the deck to hopefully get to solid wood.

    https://www.gulfstreamcomposites.com..._trapezoid.htm

    A full deck replacement is not in the cards at the moment so I think my options are as follows:

    1. Core with 1/2" marine ply imbedded in epoxy.

    2. Core with some sort of composite material that I am not yet familiar with

    3. Pour with Seacast

    Anything else I should consider? Any other tips for getting as much of the core out as possible and also being able to replace the core with something?






    1981 15\' Boston Whaler, 1987 MidOcean 26, 1973 22\' Mako (Hull+trailer for sale)

  • #2
    How in depth do you want to get? I would cut the top deck section off. scrap the old core out. Set new core of your choice, bed the skin back down and glass the seems.

    The second option would be to use a fiber/resin paste and squeeze as much as you can into the the area. You can use disposable pastry bags or 60cc syringes.
    [br]1984 Mako 224[br]1977 Mako 15[br]Clermont, Florida- [br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=37212 -Rewire[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=40627 -Tank/Misc[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=58615 - Aft Box removal

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    • #3
      to do it right youll have to go with removing top skin, dig out rotted core, bed new core, new top skin

      injecting thickened epoxy is not a long term fix
      ROGUE I[br]1978 235 CC[br]Newburyport, MA[br]ROGUE II[br]1987 17\' Montauk[br]Camden, ME[br]

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      • #4
        oh for new core you can use any of the options you mentioned

        id use a composite -- nida, divinycell, etc
        ROGUE I[br]1978 235 CC[br]Newburyport, MA[br]ROGUE II[br]1987 17\' Montauk[br]Camden, ME[br]

        Comment


        • #5
          What about replacing it from the bottom? If I cut out the hatch to be large/ able to fit my anchor I should have enough room to get some tools and there and cut out the bottom skin. The gelcoat on this boat is in excellent shape so I'm trying to avoid cutting the top skin.

          In fact I'd say cutting the top skin is off the table completely. If I'm going to cut up the deck I'm going to go through a complete overhaul and tackle the tank/whole deck and possible stringers while I'm in there. There are so many boats out there that are catching fish with rotten decks I find it hard to believe injecting resin/replacing the core from inside the whole wouldn't be 10x better than the rotten mush that would have likely lasted 5-10 years if I just ignored it.

          How do I go about deciding between the different composites?
          1981 15\' Boston Whaler, 1987 MidOcean 26, 1973 22\' Mako (Hull+trailer for sale)

          Comment


          • #6
            It sounds like you want to make the access to this hold bigger. I'd start by getting whatever hatch you want to use and then cut the deck for it. Perhaps you will get lucky and cut out all or most of the rot in the process. It might be a matter of digging out a little rot and sealing the cut edges up and you're done. If not, you will at least have more space to work through to do a repair. There is no way that you will be able to re-core that deck through the pie plate hole...
            Toronto, Canada
            76 Mako 23
            https://forum.classicmako.com/forum/...t-s-23-rebuild

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            • #7
              Glassing upside down sucks.

              Inject it with epoxy...it'll hold for awhile. You can run the boat with a soft deck for a long time.
              ROGUE I[br]1978 235 CC[br]Newburyport, MA[br]ROGUE II[br]1987 17\' Montauk[br]Camden, ME[br]

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:


                Originally posted by jamie


                It sounds like you want to make the access to this hold bigger. I'd start by getting whatever hatch you want to use and then cut the deck for it. Perhaps you will get lucky and cut out all or most of the rot in the process. It might be a matter of digging out a little rot and sealing the cut edges up and you're done. If not, you will at least have more space to work through to do a repair. There is no way that you will be able to re-core that deck through the pie plate hole...



                Yeah that's exactly the plan. I think I'm going to put it back together as is so that I have a little time to figure out how to make this new hatch.
                1981 15\' Boston Whaler, 1987 MidOcean 26, 1973 22\' Mako (Hull+trailer for sale)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I would not put the pie plate back in since you have removed the core. You could do more damage doing this then if you address it now. There are several online places that sell discounted hatches- great lake skipper, flouderpouder marine, etc.
                  quote:


                  Originally posted by Keven


                  quote:


                  Originally posted by jamie


                  It sounds like you want to make the access to this hold bigger. I'd start by getting whatever hatch you want to use and then cut the deck for it. Perhaps you will get lucky and cut out all or most of the rot in the process. It might be a matter of digging out a little rot and sealing the cut edges up and you're done. If not, you will at least have more space to work through to do a repair. There is no way that you will be able to re-core that deck through the pie plate hole...



                  Yeah that's exactly the plan. I think I'm going to put it back together as is so that I have a little time to figure out how to make this new hatch.


                  1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog
                  1985 Mako 20c - sold
                  Fort Walton Beach, FL
                  http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=42841

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had the same issues on an old 21 I worked on once. I dug out all the rotten core all around the hole. let it dry a few days, then took strips of matt and resen and started shoving them into the void all around. keep shoving these wet strips into the void until its flush with the hole. It will be strong...and its a easy cheep fix.

                    dave
                    [br]1994 Mako 215 Dual console Optimax 225[br]1978 Mako 19 with 90hp johnson[br]1996 Mako 22[br]1982 Mako 171 Angler 135 Black Max Mercury[br]1987 21b 225 Yamaha[br]1974 23 inboard Gusto gone.[br]1979m21 225johnson \"blue dolphin\" bought off this board and restored [br]with everyone\'s help!!Gone but not Forgotten....[br]1979 20 Mako 115 Suzuki gone[br]1977 19 Mako 115 Johnson gone[br]1976 23 Mako twin 140 Johnsons gone[br]1983 224 with closed transom and bracket[br]And 162 SOB (some other boats)[br]Venice Florida, Traverse city Mi.

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                    • #11
                      I would make a very neat cutout through the deck for the largest hatch possible and practical, preserving the cutout piece to become the basis for a new hatch; set this aside.

                      Now, along the edge of this new opening, dig out as much soft coring as possible. Meticulously clean the inner and outer skin and let it dry for as long as it takes. Once thoroughly dry, new core of similar material can be epoxied into place, in four pieces, carefully fitted and joined.

                      To the underside of the cutout's edge can be epoxied strips of suitable material with which to thoroughly support the new hatch.

                      The remains of the new hatch must be treated as required to completely remove the bad core and replace it in a workmanlike manner, using solid material along the edges, and glassing over these to protect them from further degradation.
                      \"Anything seems possible when you don\'t know what you\'re doing.\"

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                      • #12
                        Don't Laugh

                        I ran into a very similar issue on an old boat. I dug out as much of the old core that I could, let it dry and used dense injectable foam. I found the hardest stuff I could. It worked awesome and is still going strong. I know this is a ghetto fix but it has worked great, look less than an hour and under $8.

                        Not something I would want to do to a yacht but it is rotten and the deck has to come up to fix it correct anyway.


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