Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

1990 210 WA Boston Area

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 1990 210 WA Boston Area

    Heading into the third season with this one. My first Mako but not the first boat. It's powered by the original 1990 evinrude 200 which runs great and got a total cosmetic restoration last spring on top of all new engine electronics (regulator-rectifier, power pack, timer base and plug wires). I do a lot of striper fishing in the Boston harbor area and occasionally take the family for a harbor cruise.

    Contemplating a bracket and repower along with some light cosmetic and mechanical system upgrades but having a hard time finding someone with those capabilities in the Boston area.








    1990 Mako 210

  • #2
    I was at the boat show today and spoke with boatyards that sold Evinrude, Suzuki and Mercury and I was surprised to hear from the Mercury guy that he strongly advised against putting a bracket on the boat. Reason being the steering in reverse is really impacted since the prop wash will bounce off the transom and reduce the control. He also hemmed and hawed about the reinforcement that the transom would need at a minimum if not a full rebuild and that he would charge a few thousand to install a bracket. This started to turn me off from the idea but also sounded a little extreme.

    When I go through the project threads here I see almost half of the Makos going under the knife end up with a bracket and haven't seen the negatives discussed about a bracket addition. Does anyone have drawbacks they could describe to me about adding a bracket - reinforcement, installation, operation?

    If anyone is interested the rough pricing I got for a 200hp (motor only) was Suzuki at the low end ~$14000, and Evinrude and Mercury about ~$17000. I didn't get into the rigging and instrumentation with them all but the Merc guy said just under $20K all in with mechanical controls.
    1990 Mako 210

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm not sure I'd bracket the boat, let alone a 21. I rode a 21B model and didn't like it. That owner had the bracket fitted and installed at the stainless marine factory, so they did do a good job on the install. His first problem was the transom kept developing a superficial crack every few months which he would regularly fill, sand, and finish. This apparently was attributed to the torque. Then the purposing and cavitation issues started. While trying to fix those, he found a sort of "sweet spot" to get it running right, however the compromise was the engine was mounted so low on the bracket that in rough water he was in danger of "dunking" the engine. I once went out with him and felt real bad when I saw his brand new Etec 225 lower cowling go under the water while we were anchored and the seas picked up. So much so that we decided the engine was taking on too much water so we moved. The good part was the closed transom kept us real dry! In all seriousness Id be worried about creating a cause and effect situation where you'd end up having so much money in it, you have no option but "make it work" and continually keep chasing problems with money. Some things are better off left alone.

      Are you trying to increase boat space and layout? If so I'd look at a 230 or 250 mako.

      If trying to improve safety because you took a wave over the transom, id recommend keep the transom free of heavy coolers and lighten up on weight so the scuppers can do their job and quickly drain water.

      More interesting to me is your power choice. I too have a 210 with a 1990 Yamaha 225 and would like to reposer. How do you think a Suzuki 200 would do on the 210? I'd be real interested in a 210 with a Suzuki 4 blade prop. What do you figure your boat weighs loaded?

      I have a 210 now but am looking for the right 230 to fix up eventually, as the boat fits my needs well.

      Comment


      • #4
        Aeronona what you're saying makes sense. On top of your and the Merc guy's comments, I spoke with an evinrude dealer last night and he basically said the same thing summarized as - if the boat wasn't originally designed for a bracket its probably not going to work out. Not to mention there would be lots of additional costs to strengthen the transom and stringer knees.

        This is definitely bringing me to a decision point to repower or sell and move up because I do want more space for a better fishing platform. Two people fishing is fine, three is not ideal but manageable and tends to be the typical crew.

        I do not know the weight of the boat. I've never had more than 40 gals of fuel and usually bring minimal ice, food, drinks aboard. The prop is aluminum and not perfect but the old 200 evinrude pushes the boat pretty well topping out around 34 kts with 3 people. If there was one change I would make to the current set up it would be adding tabs to plane a bit earlier and balance the ride.
        1990 Mako 210

        Comment


        • #5
          Aeronona what you're saying makes sense. On top of your and the Merc guy's comments, I spoke with an evinrude dealer last night and he basically said the same thing summarized as - if the boat wasn't originally designed for a bracket its probably not going to work out. Not to mention there would be lots of additional costs to strengthen the transom and stringer knees.

          This is definitely bringing me to a decision point to repower or sell and move up because I do want more space for a better fishing platform. Two people fishing is fine, three is not ideal but manageable and tends to be the typical crew.

          I do not know the weight of the boat. I've never had more than 40 gals of fuel and usually bring minimal ice, food, drinks aboard. The prop is aluminum and not perfect but the old 200 evinrude pushes the boat pretty well topping out around 34 kts with 3 people. If there was one change I would make to the current set up it would be adding tabs to plane a bit earlier and balance the ride.
          1990 Mako 210

          Comment


          • #6
            Youre right. I think thats why the transom was flexing and causing that superficial crack every few months. The stringers were never extended to the transom, so the transom itself was supporting all the weight and torque of the engine.

            Ive estimated my ready to go weight around 4000 pounds on my 210 with a full tank of fuel, 3 adults, hardtop, and gear. Really love the boat. Its so unique. There are a lot of makos here in Miami, but hard to find in absolute great condition. Thats why its sonhard to think of letting mine go. Every time I think of stepping up to a 230, they are not in the best condition. I always go back to the drawing board plan on a repower. My dimelmna is engines today are so heavy. My owners manual puts the 225 Yamaha 1990 model year at 397 pounds. I do wonder if a Suzuki 200 would push it with my weight and the Miami gulfstream chop to my liking...sure would be an expensive mistake to come out of it dissatisfied with an underpowered boat after spending all that money. I do think any manufacturers 250 hp (Yamaha, Zulu, G2, aside from the new mercury motors with a 6 month waitlist) would be way to heavy Casuing the scuppers to always be underwater.

            Comment


            • #7
              Youre right. I think thats why the transom was flexing and causing that superficial crack every few months. The stringers were never extended to the transom, so the transom itself was supporting all the weight and torque of the engine.

              Ive estimated my ready to go weight around 4000 pounds on my 210 with a full tank of fuel, 3 adults, hardtop, and gear. Really love the boat. Its so unique. There are a lot of makos here in Miami, but hard to find in absolute great condition. Thats why its sonhard to think of letting mine go. Every time I think of stepping up to a 230, they are not in the best condition. I always go back to the drawing board plan on a repower. My dimelmna is engines today are so heavy. My owners manual puts the 225 Yamaha 1990 model year at 397 pounds. I do wonder if a Suzuki 200 would push it with my weight and the Miami gulfstream chop to my liking...sure would be an expensive mistake to come out of it dissatisfied with an underpowered boat after spending all that money. I do think any manufacturers 250 hp (Yamaha, Zulu, G2, aside from the new mercury motors with a 6 month waitlist) would be way to heavy Casuing the scuppers to always be underwater.

              Comment

              Working...
              X