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Carb/Injector Cleaning on a 4 Stroke

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  • Carb/Injector Cleaning on a 4 Stroke

    Hi everyone,

    I purchased a new Honda BF60A a couple of months ago. I have close to 20 hours on it, and was wondering when and how to clean out the carb/injectors. I was thinking of using one of the fuel additives like Gumout by adding it to a full tank of fuel. I do burn out the fuel at the end of my day so I shouldn't have issues early on with ethanol residue. I have used Sea Foam in the past for my 2 stroke engines. What have others found to be the best way to clean out the carb/injector system?
    Mark Kriz[br]Mako15 1974[br]Mercury Thunderbolt 800 1972[br]Maple Valley, WA[br][br]

  • #2
    I wonder if you can buy NON Ethanol fuel in your area? If you could you would save a lot of headaches down the road. as far as cleaning the injectors I would not worry about it as long as you have good performance and continue to use additives. I would NOT run the fuel out each time you put the boat back on the trailer. Electric fuel pumps do not like to run dry. Enjoy your Honda....I love mine..have a 150, and a couple of 225's One of my 225's has over 5000 hours..
    [br]1994 Mako 215 Dual console Optimax 225[br]1978 Mako 19 with 90hp johnson[br]1996 Mako 22[br]1982 Mako 171 Angler 135 Black Max Mercury[br]1987 21b 225 Yamaha[br]1974 23 inboard Gusto gone.[br]1979m21 225johnson \"blue dolphin\" bought off this board and restored [br]with everyone\'s help!!Gone but not Forgotten....[br]1979 20 Mako 115 Suzuki gone[br]1977 19 Mako 115 Johnson gone[br]1976 23 Mako twin 140 Johnsons gone[br]1983 224 with closed transom and bracket[br]And 162 SOB (some other boats)[br]Venice Florida, Traverse city Mi.

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    • #3
      New to you or brand new from Honda? If it is still under warranty - be very

      careful to NOT give them an excuse should a problem arise.
      1984 Mako 228 w/ 175hp E-Tec [br]1983 SeaRay 26\' Sundancer w/ 454 Big Block spinning Volvo DuoProps (Sold)[br]1989 Wahoo 17\' CC w/ 88hp Evinrude (vacationing in Key West)[br]

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      • #4
        New to you or brand new from Honda? If it is still under warranty - be very

        careful to NOT give them an excuse should a problem arise.
        1984 Mako 228 w/ 175hp E-Tec [br]1983 SeaRay 26\' Sundancer w/ 454 Big Block spinning Volvo DuoProps (Sold)[br]1989 Wahoo 17\' CC w/ 88hp Evinrude (vacationing in Key West)[br]

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        • #5
          Brand new to Honda. I had a 9.8 Tohatsu, then a 1972 Merc thunderbolt 800. The Honda runs great, but I am wondering about maintenance to prevent issues down the road. I have read on a number of occasions ethanal will gum up an engine. I always burned out all fuel at the end of the day on the Tohatsu. The only ethanol free gas I can get here is 93% octane. Otherwise it is all 10% ethanol, which is why I wonder about how to clean out the carbs. I haven't purchased the shop manual yet (it's $100), but may be coming for Christmas. I am keeping fresh gas with stablizer added.

          Mark
          Mark Kriz[br]Mako15 1974[br]Mercury Thunderbolt 800 1972[br]Maple Valley, WA[br][br]

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          • #6
            I have a Honda BF50 from the first year they came out, think it's a '95 or so. In NJ the only fuel you can get is ethanol, no options for non-ethanol that I know of. Maintenance on this motor for the last 20 years consisted of impeller every 5 years or so, spark plugs around the same interval, oil change about every 3 years, fuel filters every year, fog the motor in the fall, start in in the spring. I add sta-bil marine formula to every drop of gas that goes in it. As far as I can tell this is the most bulletproof motor ever built. Every spring, I just hook up the battery, pump the bulb, choke it, turn the key, it starts. Good luck, I'm sure you'll get 20+ years out of yours.

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            • #7
              So Footy3, do you burn the fuel out of your engine before you store it for the winter? Here in the Seattle area we rarely get to freezing, so I fish all year round! Usually get to run the boat 2 times a month minimum.
              Mark Kriz[br]Mako15 1974[br]Mercury Thunderbolt 800 1972[br]Maple Valley, WA[br][br]

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              • #8
                No, I never burn the fuel out. I try to keep the tank low/empty over the winter, then I put in 5 fresh gallons with stabil in the spring, run that down to almost empty, repeat, and then after that fill up. I know there are as many theories about ethanol fuel storage and empty tank/full tank as there are fisherman, this is what I do and it works for me. I have never had any problems with varnish/dirt etc.

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                • #9
                  So for all those following this discussion, I wrote Honda and asked about running the fuel out, and here is what the tech said in an email: There is no benefit to running the engine dry since there are no carbs. The engine is essentially an automotive engine turned vertically. Fuel will remain in the motor even if it is run dry, in the VST (I don't know what the VST is). The engine will die, but fuel is still in the VST.

                  There was no mention of harm to the engine either, and I did ask specifically if it would cause harm.

                  I at least want to burn out some of the fuel in the hose line (I don't like the little drips off the connector). I still think it might be a good idea to drain the fuel completely if the engine is to sit idle for 2 or more months, though I will say it is very unlikely to happen ;-)
                  Mark Kriz[br]Mako15 1974[br]Mercury Thunderbolt 800 1972[br]Maple Valley, WA[br][br]

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                  • #10
                    The VST (vapor separator tank) is mounted on the side of your motor and has your high pressure fuel pump in it along with a fuel filter, float, and needle valve. Most older boats have a low pressure diaphragm fuel pump (or 2 In the case of my OX66s) that helps supply fuel for the VST from the fuel tank. Once in the VST, the fuel rises until the float lifts and shuts the needle valve which fills VST. The high pressure fuel pump then supplies fuel from the VST to the fuel rail where your injectors are located .

                    Bottom line, you can run the motor free of gas and there is also a drain located on the bottom of the VST that you can use so that the old gas will not gum up your filter and needle valve. A simple 1 min drain can save you hours of VST removal and cleaning
                    1990 - 261 [br]1968 -19 (First 40)[br][email protected]

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