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  • Another 261 rebuild

    Hey all, figured i'd start a thread on my adventures of getting my 88 261 back to running shape.

    I bought her back in September and have only run her twice before noticing issues that need to be fixed. So she's been parked ever since. To start I had to put a new trailer under her as the one she came on was cracked and didn't a have trailer brakes. I started to wet sand/ buff her and made good progress, she really started to shine, but as someone who can never leave things alone I started taking the bottom paint off as it looked like garbage and had all kinds of holes in it. During that process I found a bunch of gashes in the fiberglass that would need to be repaired. So I talked to a couple shops about repainting her as well as fixing all the fiberglass. So she's been sitting while the shop I choose finishes up another boat.

    The Day I brought her Home.



    Parked next to my Skeeter ZX180



    New Trailer



    After some buffing



    Some bottom paint removed





    Stuff gets everywhere...



    The 1st day I had her out out for a shakedown in a fresh water spring.



    In the meantime I started pulling the thru hull fittings in an effort to start redoing the plumbing. The prior owner had bronze fittings with PVC ball valves screwed onto the ends. Those absolutely had to go. Some water came out of one of the fittings and the transom core was really wet. I've had a fan on for about 2 weeks now drying that out. Wood is still bonded to the glass and Im not able to dig a knife into it.





    10 bucks in sockets to make something to hold onto the thru hull fittings. Worked perfect



    Previous owner also decided to drill some big ass holes and run plumbing up through the below deck livewell. Personally I think it looks awful, so I ripped all that crap out. Most was just held on with silicone...





    So much better, just need to patch the holes



    I ordered some new hydraulic steering seals as you can turn the wheel 5 or 6 times before both motors move and some new fuel filters as they're all fairly easy to replace. Pulled the fuel filters this morning and look what I found.....





    Soooo i'm about to start the joyful task of pulling the t-top and console. I can't wait to see what the tank looks like, but it'll be good because when I tried to put gas in her last time the pump would click off every 1 - 2 seconds. Anybody know how or where to have a tank pumped out in the Orlando area? Not sure how much gas is in it as I don't believe the gauge works. I work out of town 4 days a week so this may be a long process.
    1988 Mako 261

  • #2
    Yeesh. What exactly is the debris in the fuel filters?
    Texas[br]\'76 Mako 23- A work in progress[br]

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    • #3
      quote:


      Originally posted by Sharpest


      Yeesh. What exactly is the debris in the fuel filters?



      I'm not really sure. It's like a fine powder. When you touch it, it feels like flour. Definitely not good.

      Didnt get nearly as much done as I was hoping this weekend. Spent most of the time labeling important wires to hopefully get this thing to work again should I ever finish it. Over the years prior owners have no done a clean job wiring.

      Before



      After



      I did get a peek at the tank, it's a true work of art...





      I still get any gas odor from the tank, but obviously its seen better days.. next weekend I'll hopefully be able to finish pulling the t top and console.
      1988 Mako 261

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      • #4
        Where in Orlando are you? I am in Clermont and can lend a hand if you need one.
        [br]1984 Mako 224[br]1977 Mako 15[br]Clermont, Florida- [br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=37212 -Rewire[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=40627 -Tank/Misc[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=58615 - Aft Box removal

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        • #5
          Let me know if you need help, I have lots of empty 275 gal totes and a pump setup to empty out your tank (I did mine for a tank replacement). I'm west of town in Winter Garden and others on the forum can help out.
          [br]Mako 241[br]Winter Garden, FL

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          • #6
            Thank you both! I'll let you all know if I need a hand. I'm in Winter Springs so not too far away. I'm gonna try to get the lid pulled this weekend and see how much gas is in the tank. And get started on digging foam out. Where do you get rid of the gas once you pump it out?

            I also have a guy coming the weekend after this one to get some measurements to start building me a custom wiring harness for the boat.
            1988 Mako 261

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            • #7
              Looking great.

              What did you use to get the bottom paint off.
              ROGUE I[br]1978 235 CC[br]Newburyport, MA[br]ROGUE II[br]1987 17\' Montauk[br]Camden, ME[br]

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              • #8
                quote:


                Originally posted by Justin


                Looking great.


                What did you use to get the bottom paint off.


                3000psi pressure washer and 80 grit lol. Extremely messy and my driveway is still blue. I tried Citri-strip paint stripper and it didn't do anything for me. Loosened up the layer of paint that it was in contact with, but nothing underneath. The paint shop is going to remove the rest of it that I didnt get.
                1988 Mako 261

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                • #9
                  Looks like a good winter project!

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                  • #10
                    I had the same fuel troubles. I have coffee cans of that powder somewhere. Its evaporated gas, is the best way I can describe it whether thats referred to as varnish idk. I used a boroscope in my tank(boat sat 16 years) and you could see the line of powder and clumps where the fuel level was. Bad thing is it doesnt dissolve or mix into anything I could find. I pumped the gas out through a system of filters to remove what was loose and then pressure washed the inside of the tank with diy fittings through any access hole I could find. Pumping the contaminated water out every so often. Eventually it was fixed. Hindsight I shouldve just replaced the tank
                    1989 Mako 261[br]SOLD - 1987 231 restore/rebuild http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46836&whichpage=1[br]

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                    • #11
                      quote:


                      Originally posted by 231Mike


                      I had the same fuel troubles. I have coffee cans of that powder somewhere. Its evaporated gas, is the best way I can describe it whether thats referred to as varnish idk. I used a boroscope in my tank(boat sat 16 years) and you could see the line of powder and clumps where the fuel level was. Bad thing is it doesnt dissolve or mix into anything I could find. I pumped the gas out through a system of filters to remove what was loose and then pressure washed the inside of the tank with diy fittings through any access hole I could find. Pumping the contaminated water out every so often. Eventually it was fixed. Hindsight I shouldve just replaced the tank



                      Interesting. Did you try a heavy duty degreaser like Deep purple or something? What did you do with the old gas?

                      I would love to save this tank as it would be a big cost savings, but just judging what I can see through the hatches, its toast. I was thinking I could cut the top of the tank, clean it and then have a shop re-weld back together, but that may be more hassle than its worth, especially if its full of holes. But if you're saying that the debris is old/ evaporated gas, maybe it'll pass a pressure test?
                      1988 Mako 261

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                      • #12
                        Being a welder and fabricator I can tell you that the tank is not going to weld back together very easily. Someone might tell you that they can do it (and probably they can) but the contaminates in the aluminum (salt, corrosion, fuel) will all cause the weld to lose its integrity. I wouldn't trust anything to hold fuel after being re-welded like that. Just my 0.02 worth. I'm in Lakeland/Polk city if you need any help with the metal work. I suck at fiberglass though LOL!
                        '90 Tuppens 231 Polk City, FL

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                        • #13
                          quote:


                          Originally posted by Wpeavy


                          Being a welder and fabricator I can tell you that the tank is not going to weld back together very easily. Someone might tell you that they can do it (and probably they can) but the contaminates in the aluminum (salt, corrosion, fuel) will all cause the weld to lose its integrity. I wouldn't trust anything to hold fuel after being re-welded like that. Just my 0.02 worth. I'm in Lakeland/Polk city if you need any help with the metal work. I suck at fiberglass though LOL!



                          Good point, didn't think of the contaminants in the metal from years of being in the salt. I taught myself to weld a little bit, but thats on steel, i've never tried aluminium lol. I rebuilt the steel trailer under my bass boat last spring and so far it hasn't fallen apart.

                          Welded on all new bunk mounts, fenders and cut out random rust spots and welded in new metal and painted.

                          I lost the pic of a bead that looked like a roll of quarters laying on it side.





                          Back on topic, hijacked my own thread lol.

                          I think tomorrow during lunch I'll give sunshine a call and start inquiring about a new tank for this thing.
                          1988 Mako 261

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                          • #14
                            Got a little more done now that i'm home. Huge thanks to a buddy of mine that helped get the t-top and console out. No way 1 person could do that without damaging something. The t-top was a lot heavier than we were expecting and in hind sight should have pulled the boat forward to give us more room, but we got it done. Also got the tank lid pulled, it honestly wasn't that bad. Picking the sealant out was kinda annoying, but a pick and small flat head and it came out without too much trouble. Now I just need to get the tank drained and start attacking foam. I think I'm gonna cut the coffin box as well and try to get as much foam out as possible, you can see black foam through some of the holes..

                            2 questions:

                            1. What works best at removing foam?

                            2. Are the fill hose and vent line foamed in? If so whats the best way to get them out so I can replace?







                            Previous owner told me "oh yeah gas gauge works fine, it's got around 150 gallons in it." Pretty sure that gas gauge hasn't worked in a LONG time.



                            Also I didn't get a chance to call about getting a new tank built, but the yamaha parts place near me recommended a local shop that build airboats. He said they build aluminum tanks and pressure test them etc. Never hurts to have options right?
                            1988 Mako 261

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                            • #15
                              Not sure what you said about having a custom wire harness fabricated. I have helped a number of CM members providing Excel spreadsheet of electrical components, wiring diagrams and power wiring requirements. Only harness is probably from switch panel to terminal strip for devices. Typically provide a list of all electrical components with load requirements. List all device including future possible devices. Provide all electronic devices including N2K network if desired. You can have a custom switch panel fabricated or look at Blueseas switch panel options. List all pump requirements, bilge, livewell, macreator and washdown pumps. Electronic to include GPS/depth finder, radar and MFD requirements. Suggest changing all lighting to LED. Power management suggest Marinco BEP cluster. Suggest Blueseas fusepanel and circuit breakers. Hope this helps you to determine your electrical requirements. Let me know at DMK one one six at comcast dot net.
                              Keyman[br]Paoli, PA

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