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1975 23 Inboard (update 4/6 recessing trim tabs)

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  • #76
    That 6.2 Indmar looks bada$$, I agree with the name Raptor.

    Side note, a Hotshot hauler had his valve train let go-----at 417,000 miles, on a 6.2.

    In SoFla I see 17 Makos every where, I don't recall ever seeing one in person, looks like the type hull to go through anything, just not super fast, like that's a bad thing.

    Hope the clearances work out for you!

    BWP
    [br]Starcraft Bluewater 180, 1988[br]1996 Mercury 115 2+2 exlpto[br]Project Link: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46572

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    • #77
      Here's an update... might be a little disappointing. For much of my free time lately, the weather has been shitty. Seems like I spend as much time bailing the boat out as I do working on it.

      The engine: Pretty cool that I was able to find this sweet Indmar Raptor Engine, BUT there's a big disadvantage to it: This motor is only an OEM installed motor in about 3 brands of ski boats... I've been largely on my own as to figuring out how I will be wiring everything and doing the rigging. I even have had to design my own display that will interface with the engine via CanBus, which I knew zero about before. Should turn out pretty cool though.

      Other than that I'm doing a bunch of dry-fitting, just because I mostly can't find time or the weather to get the stuff in. Here's some pics just so you guys don't think I'm dead.

      I expect to be picking up the pace in the next month or so. Still want to have her in the water by summer.












      [img=left]https://i.imgur.com/b1nW04t.jpg?2[/img=left][br]1975 23 Inboard [br]Chesapeake, VA[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=59930

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      • #78
        I decided to move my focus to the hull of the boat and get that completely done so I can put the boat back on a trailer. I can't get the motor in the boat as it sits right now on jack stands. Don't want to have to take it off the trailer again.

        Needless to say, my sander and I have become close recently. Being an older boat, there are countless dings, scrapes, you know the deal.. Plus the bow needed a considerable amount of work. The bottom paint in some areas was a quarter inch thick and I still don't have 100 percent of it off.








        [img=left]https://i.imgur.com/b1nW04t.jpg?2[/img=left][br]1975 23 Inboard [br]Chesapeake, VA[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=59930

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        • #79
          The thing I was tossing around in my head for a long time--- the trim tabs.. I don't want those line cutters hanging off the stern of the boat, ruining one of only advantages of an inboard over an outboard.

          So the hell with it, I started cutting. I'm going to recess these ****ers up there come hell or high water. Seems like this might just work out.






          [img=left]https://i.imgur.com/b1nW04t.jpg?2[/img=left][br]1975 23 Inboard [br]Chesapeake, VA[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=59930

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          • #80
            Love the look and function of recessed tabs. Im planning the same for my 25 Anacapri build Ill be digging into when I wrap up the 17 here soon. I ended up passing on the 23 Mako like yours but only because the other hull came available free while the owner of the Mako was trying to locate the title and I was looking for more deadrise for runs to the West End. Im still in love with the shear line of that 23!

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            • #81
              quote:


              Originally posted by 2TDave


              Love the look and function of recessed tabs. Im planning the same for my 25 Anacapri build Ill be digging into when I wrap up the 17 here soon. I ended up passing on the 23 Mako like yours but only because the other hull came available free while the owner of the Mako was trying to locate the title and I was looking for more deadrise for runs to the West End. Im still in love with the shear line of that 23!



              So I found a guy on THT that makes molds for the trim tab pockets. He wanted like $600 for them.. I'm glad I didn't do that now, because this is going to work out great. (note: looks bigger in the picture because I ground away a lot of the gelcoat to make room to glass)


              [img=left]https://i.imgur.com/b1nW04t.jpg?2[/img=left][br]1975 23 Inboard [br]Chesapeake, VA[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=59930

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              • #82
                very cool job on the trim tabs.
                1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog[br]1985 Mako 20c - sold[br]Mary Esther, FL[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=42841[br]

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                • #83
                  I feel your pain on the bottom paint. It took me and my buddy three days to get "almost" all of it off, then me who knows how many hours to do the detail work before 2000e. If I had known before hand I would have paid someone to soda/sand blast.

                  Project looks awesome, love the pockets, and that motor is going to be bad ass. Just keep at it, try to do something small every day. I started with the thought that a rewire and repaint would be a simple couple weekends......months later lol. Take your time and do it right the first time.

                  Good luck, let me know if I can help with any CNC parts. Us 23' guys have to stick together[]

                  -Jeff

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                  • #84
                    dry fit the motor. I haven't been posting in a long time since the site went through all the changes. Shes coming along though. Click image for larger version

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                    [img=left]https://i.imgur.com/b1nW04t.jpg?2[/img=left][br]1975 23 Inboard [br]Chesapeake, VA[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=59930

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by TBrown View Post
                      I'm restoring one of these as well, but mine's a 1975. Huge pain in the butt as that year had above-deck tanks. I paid two arms and three legs for mine and had to design them myself.
                      I ended up with two 80 gallon saddle tanks.. What I'm trying to figure out now is a way to keep them relatively equal without having to dick around with switching back and forth all day.

                      Originally posted by flounder View Post
                      What if you run a single line from the engine back to a tee that is set mid way between and above the tank pick up tubes?
                      I should think the tee would equalize the pull out of the tanks.
                      In addition, if it were mine, I'd put shut off valves on both sides of the tee in order to isolate one tank or the other in the event a tank is contaminated or fails. The valves could be attached to the tank pick-ups and accessible through deck plates which I want to have above the tank pick-up fixtures. The tee could be located at a high point under the deck which could be serviced through the hatch behind the console.
                      Originally posted by TBrown View Post
                      My engine is an EFI Ford Raptor with no return line back to the tanks, so this idea won't work unfortunately.
                      Sorry for high-jacking trace elements thread.

                      I'm not sure I understand why a return line would be needed. My thinking is that if you split the incoming line in two, you will have equal suction into each tank. It may or may not require an electric pump but you would not have to be switching tanks manually.
                      Ole Joe
                      Just floundering around
                      White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                      1978 Mako 25

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                      • #86
                        Originally posted by flounder View Post
                        [FONT=Calibri][COLOR=#1c1c1c][I]
                        [FONT=Calibri][FONT=Helvetica][COLOR=#1c1c1c]

                        Sorry for high-jacking trace elements thread.

                        I'm not sure I understand why a return line would be needed. My thinking is that if you split the incoming line in two, you will have equal suction into each tank. It may or may not require an electric pump but you would not have to be switching tanks manually.
                        The problem is a fluid mechanics problem. The fuel pump draws fuel from the tank creating a negative pressure in the fuel line before it splits. If there is unequal head in the two fuel lines leading to the two separate tanks after the junction, a higher flow rate of fuel will be pulled from the tank with the lower head condition. The head can be increased on one fuel line if it is longer or has a larger elevation change, or if one hose is obstructed or kinked.

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                        • #87
                          Thanks. I guess I had it backwards.

                          I thought the fuel would be pulled from the tank that has more fuel in the tank as long as both the "split" lines are equal in length and the Tee was above the pick-up tube connection. It seemed to me that that the higher fuel level would create less resistance to the pump and therefore the suction would favor that line, thus leveling the (heads) fuel levels.
                          Last edited by flounder; 03-27-2020, 07:28 AM.
                          Ole Joe
                          Just floundering around
                          White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                          1978 Mako 25

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