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  • Replacing Stringers

    Hi everyone my name is Wyatt and I recently purchased a 1979 23 Mako. I am new to the form and have looked through a lot of projects on here and I am very impressed on some of the work I have seen. I have not done much fiberglass work before so this should be a good learning experience for me.

    I have cut the top of the fiberglass off on one of the stringers and was able to remove the wood. I don't know how this will work for the rest of the stringers but it went surprisingly well on this one. My question is if I am able to remove the wood from the stringer in one piece could I cut new plywood, coat it with resin and put it into the existing fiberglass stringer then just glass over everything to seal it?

    Also I would like to post some pictures but I am not sure how this.

  • #2
    I would think if you cut the top off and have the trough there, you could fill the stringer with a pour-able material like Sea-Cast. Why put wood back in there? Pretty easy to mix and self level.

    As for the pictures, I posted some screen shots on this posting of the Jesse Lee http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=59311

    Good luck
    1982 Whaler Montauk 90HP( sold)[br]1977 25 Mako CC 225HP

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    • #3
      Thanks rustyolddad and I have thought about doing some type of composite material that you pour in. I just have not seen a lot of people do that. Plus I figured if that wood has lasted 40 years it should last me that long. But either way I'm still on the fence for which material I would like to use. If anyone has input on what would be a good material to go with, I am open to all suggestions. Thanks and here are a few pics of the one stringer I have been messing with.




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      • #4
        Agreed either way is great, I just like self leveling compounds that are polymer based. There are some youtube links out their for pouring stringsers.

        Glad the picture directions worked out for you!
        quote:


        Originally posted by Ctuck23mako


        Thanks rustyolddad and I have thought about doing some type of composite material that you pour in. I just have not seen a lot of people do that. Plus I figured if that wood has lasted 40 years it should last me that long. But either way I'm still on the fence for which material I would like to use. If anyone has input on what would be a good material to go with, I am open to all suggestions. Thanks and here are a few pics of the one stringer I have been messing with.







        1982 Whaler Montauk 90HP( sold)[br]1977 25 Mako CC 225HP

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        • #5
          I'd be concerned about cleaning out the interior skin of the existing stringer enough to prevent delamination later. I guess plenty of people have done pour in transoms and are happy with them but the whole idea seems problematic to me. Cutting the inside layer of glass out would allow you to clean the shit out of the outer layer and the hull bottom The outer layer was MUCH more difficult to tab in on my 76 23's stringers due to the hull profile. I've actually thought about doing it exactly that way if I ever build another boat but I kinda figured there's a reason I haven't seen anyone do that yet.
          Texas[br]\'76 Mako 23- A work in progress[br]

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          • #6
            I've been eyeing up a 25 mako that I would look into doing exactly what you're talking about but using coosa board to make full height stringers. U would think a flap wheel would be able to sand the sides of the inside just sure about the bottom.

            https://goo.gl/images/QVZ7xW
            1977 mako 23

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            • #7
              Could you use something like a Heavy Duty Bandfile Belt Sander

              https://www.harborfreight.com/53-amp...der-62863.html

              or

              https://www.harborfreight.com/38-in-...der-60627.html

              to sand/clean out the void within the stringers before you pour?

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              • #8
                I feel like if I can get the channel cleaned out good enough for the new material (wood or sea-cast) should adhere to the existing fiberglass with no problems. I think a flap wheel and a dynafile with a sanding belt would be the tools for the job.

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                • #9
                  I think you're pushing your look if you think wood will get a good, uniform bond with the existing glass.

                  If you want to pour that may be doable...but IMO stuffing wood in isnt a great idea. At that rate, just start withe fresh glass.
                  ROGUE I[br]1978 235 CC[br]Newburyport, MA[br]ROGUE II[br]1987 17\' Montauk[br]Camden, ME[br]

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                  • #10
                    I'm curious what prompted this fix? The wood doesn't look that bad in the pics?

                    I have always been a believer that the wood is merely an inexpensive form to drape the structural glass over. I'm sure it adds some integrity, of course, its wood. But that wasn't the sole purpose. That's why you see stringers cored with foam now. The core isn't doing the heavy lifting. The orientation of the glass perpendicular to the hull is what gives the hull the structural integrity.

                    Anyway, if they were my stringers. I think the best and easiest thing to do is somehow grind the inner surface. Maybe a drum sander bit with an extension? Roll in a hot coat of resin on each side. To keep cost down, I'd use some marine ply and insert into the cavity, coat the ply with poly. Then pour in some Nidacore/Arjay to take up any voids. Since you broke that original glass stringer on the top, you'll have to grind the strings and over lay some new glass. Looking at pourables now, i think they were close to $200 a pail after shipping and hazard fees.

                    This is just my $.02
                    [br]Michael R. Delgado[br]1972 Mako 22[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=15745[br]1976 Mako 25[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=18013&SearchTerms=mako,25[br]

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                    • #11
                      The reason I am replacing them is because I already had to redo the floor and put in a new fuel tank, so I didn't want to do all this work again later.

                      The stringers have some rot and were completely soaking wet, so I know they would do nothing but get worse.

                      mrdelgado are you saying to maybe put 1/2" plywood in and then pore in a filler between the existing glass and the wood to fill the void.

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                      • #12
                        I would pour them full of Arjay and cover with a layer of glass. Remove whatever woods left inside the stringer with a good pressure washer. Plus the pressure washer will show you any holes in the fiberglass before you pour them full. I did my transom with Arjay 6011 and its like cement, but leaks are a pain in the a**. []
                        1978 Mako 21[br]Schneider [br]Butler, PA

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                        • #13
                          Yeah if you're going to poor at all, just poor the whole thing.

                          When I redid my tank I drilled into my stringers amidships and was pleased to find them bone dry...scary anticipation in that moment.
                          ROGUE I[br]1978 235 CC[br]Newburyport, MA[br]ROGUE II[br]1987 17\' Montauk[br]Camden, ME[br]

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                          • #14
                            So I finally got the wood pulled out from the pocket and have started sanding and grinding everything to get it cleaned and ready for the new wood. Yes I have decided to go back with wood for my stringers because the old wood lasted for 40 years, and they looked to be just pieces of 1x pine. I am still leaving part of the fiberglass for the stringers in place as a guide for when I put the new wood in.



                            This is how I am sanding the inside of the pockets out. This method is working pretty good and allowing me to sand both sides and at the bottom of the pocket.



                            The old wood I pulled out. A few of the pieces were in decent shape and just starting to rot, but all of them were waterlogged.


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                            • #15
                              I'm impressed that shit came out in one piece. Mine were in much uglier condition and I cut them all the way out!
                              Texas[br]\'76 Mako 23- A work in progress[br]

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