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  • Transom replacement

    Guys, jumping into replacing the transom. Going with Marine plywood (from Home Depot) for the coring. I know some of you all may have other materials to recommend, but I figured if the original was plywood and it lasted 30+ years, I figured it was good enough for me. Going to change the design up some to minimize the amount of water that may come over the transom. I was also thinking about cutting out the outer skin leaving 2 inches to glass it back in.

    My question is, I need to know what type of matting to use and the amount of each one to do a proper replacement. Any and all ideas welcome.

  • #2
    I've never seen marine plywood at Home Depot. I'd be real careful there.

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    • #3
      They have it. You just ain't searched for it. It isn't the $300 a sheet Marenti wood; but as I said, if the original core of the transom Mako used was regular old plywood then it should be fine for what I need.

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      • #4
        I havent seen marine marine plywood at home Depot or Lowe's and I searched high and low for when redoing my stringers. I did however find at a local lumber yard that happen to stock it I never thought they would. You should call around different lumber yards in your area. It's worth the couple of phone calls and they might lead you in the right direction to get some without having to pay for shipping. I paid $105 a sheet which was well worth it.
        1977 mako 23

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        • #5
          The stuff at home depot is AB grade plywood. You'd be best to find someone close to you selling Hydrotek plywood. The plywood used in the old makos was good wood treated with Arsnick and Creosote, not the sh** there selling us today as treated plywood full of knots and putty filler. I would use either Arjay or Coosa Blue water, I used Arjay for my transom rebuild.
          1978 Mako 21[br]Schneider [br]Butler, PA

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          • #6
            Ok, so I will look around for better wood. With that aside, any arguments against going through the outer skin?

            Also, I need to know what layup has been used. I guess it wouldn't matter if I am able to re-use the old skin again and I glass it back, but just in case I cant re-use it I would like some options.

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            • #7
              I would think if your using wood, it might be easier to just start over laminating new cloth to the new wood for strength, compared to trying to getting the old skin to bond to the new plywood. But not really sure since I didn't go that route. When I poured my transom I enclosed my transom and made a new skin. I used vinyl ester resin with 1708 Bi-Axial cloth. Don't remember what weight, but was close to 1/8" thick and I used 7 layers in my layup for the outer and inner skin. I can post a link to Flickr if you want me to.[]
              1978 Mako 21[br]Schneider [br]Butler, PA

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              • #8
                I used wood also, found it for 85$ a sheet at my local lumber yard.

                I went from the inside.

                But if I were to go from the out side I'd leave at least a 3in lip to glass to. And the lay up once the old core was out would have been.

                2 layers of csm (1.5oz chop strand mat)

                1 sheet of ply

                1 layer of 1.5 oz csm

                1 sheet of ply

                1 layer of csm

                Then at least 3 layers of 1708

                Building up to your original outer skin.

                In this process remember you need to make a good bond so figure out some large thru bolts with backers. I used all thread and nuts/washers backed up on pieces of 2x4. You want to almost crush the ply on to the original inside skin.

                Then the second layer of ply you can simply screw to the 1st. Remove the screws once cured then finish the lay up.

                Let the 1st layer of ply fully cure to the inside skin before putting on the 2nd ply.

                Hope this helps. I am by no means a professional but after doing what I've done in my project it seems like the fastest way to get back on the water is going from the outside.

                But knowing how these boats are built now that I'm fully into it. I'd go from the inside every time! Just to beef up the stringers and redo the bilge area to my liking.
                Fort Lauderdale, FL[br]1990 231 Mako[br]1998 Keywest 1720[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=48918[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=57912[br][/url]

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                • #9
                  ** building up to your original outer skin thickness with csm so you have a good sanding/fairing surface.
                  Fort Lauderdale, FL[br]1990 231 Mako[br]1998 Keywest 1720[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=48918[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=57912[br][/url]

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                  • #10
                    If you're using poly or vinylester resin, prime the plywood first with a coating of resin thinned 20-25% with styrene (and appropriate hardener), and don't forget the plywood edges. The resin will soak into the plywood and your glass will adhere to the treated plywood much better. Good luck with the transom.[8D]

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                    • #11
                      quote:


                      Originally posted by make231


                      I used wood also, found it for 85$ a sheet at my local lumber yard.

                      I went from the inside.

                      But if I were to go from the out side I'd leave at least a 3in lip to glass to. And the lay up once the old core was out would have been.

                      2 layers of csm (1.5oz chop strand mat)

                      1 sheet of ply

                      1 layer of 1.5 oz csm

                      1 sheet of ply

                      1 layer of csm

                      Then at least 3 layers of 1708

                      Building up to your original outer skin.


                      In this process remember you need to make a good bond so figure out some large thru bolts with backers. I used all thread and nuts/washers backed up on pieces of 2x4. You want to almost crush the ply on to the original inside skin.

                      Then the second layer of ply you can simply screw to the 1st. Remove the screws once cured then finish the lay up.

                      Let the 1st layer of ply fully cure to the inside skin before putting on the 2nd ply.

                      Hope this helps. I am by no means a professional but after doing what I've done in my project it seems like the fastest way to get back on the water is going from the outside.

                      But knowing how these boats are built now that I'm fully into it. I'd go from the inside every time! Just to beef up the stringers and redo the bilge area to my liking.


                      Make231,

                      What lumber yard did you find it at. I'm in Homestead wouldn't mind driving up a bit to get good quality wood for the transom especially at 85 a piece.

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                      • #12
                        just a suggestion, look up corelite foam board. I just got a 4x8 piece of " for about 130 bucks. I used it for my coffin lid but will probably use it on my transom too if i dont pour it. Theres a couple guys online that used it for transoms. Not sure what your paying for the plywood
                        1991 221 w/ 225 yamaha[br]Margate NJ[br]221 Fuel tank/rewire[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=58899

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                        • #13
                          I paid around $70 per sheet for 3/4" AB grade marine plywood from MG Supply here in Texas.
                          Texas[br]\'76 Mako 23- A work in progress[br]

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                          • #14
                            Ok so I called around and got quotes of $145 for Meranti and $164 for okoume. That is per sheet of 3/4 4x8. These are at local shops where I can pick up. Anything else would be expensive to ship. Are these prices good?

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                            • #15
                              84 lumber. Is where I got it from. Also while your up this way you must go by Fgci.com your best one stop fiber glass store.
                              Fort Lauderdale, FL[br]1990 231 Mako[br]1998 Keywest 1720[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=48918[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=57912[br][/url]

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