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  • Question about moving batteries

    Hi guys, Im gonna be moving my 2 batteries under the console in the coming weeks. After some research Ive concluded that 1/0 will suit my needs. As Im putting my list of supplies to order together, Im unsure of how to connect the wire to the motor. Are you guys running 1/0 or 2/0 wire directly into the motor? Or are you connecting the existing pigtails coming from the motor to the new wire somewhere in the bilge area via some kind of terminal posts? Also, looking for a crimping tool, do you have one you guys recommend thats not too overly expensive. I saw a batt wire crimping tool for 230$. Too expensive for something Ill probably use only a few times.
    Long Island NY [br]1985 Mako 20C[br]2003 Yamaha OX66 150[br]

  • #2
    There are a number of threads which detail of moving the batteries. What size motor do you have? The wire gauge size is determined by totaling the cable run for both plus and negative wires. Ancor provides a table for determining the wire gauge based on ampacity and total cable run with 3% voltage drop. Typically install power post in a dry place for terminating the battery extension cable to motor cables. Purchase battery boxes sized per series of batteries. Take a look at Marinco BEP cluster for battery management. I have provided Excel spreadsheet for electrical components for others . Estimated cost about $1000-1200 depending on price matching from online sites. As much as I dislike West Marine they now will price match components. They also have a working table with heavy duty crimping tools. Let me know.
    Keyman[br]Paoli, PA

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    • #3
      quote:


      Originally posted by keyman


      There are a number of threads which detail of moving the batteries. What size motor do you have? The wire gauge sie is determined by totaling the cable rub for bothe plus and negative wires. Ancor provides a table for determining the wire gauge based on ampacity and total cable run with 3% voltage drop. Typically install power post in a dry place for terminating the battery extension cable to motor cables. Purchase battery boxes sized per series of batteries. Take a look at Marinco BEP cluster for battery management. I have provided Excel spreadsheet for electrical components for others . Estimated cost about $1000-1200 depending on price matching from online sites. As much as I dislike West Marine they now will price match components. They also have a working table with heavy duty crimping tools. Let me know.



      Power posts, Thank you.
      Long Island NY [br]1985 Mako 20C[br]2003 Yamaha OX66 150[br]

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      • #4
        I dont know how good this tool is, But I have a similar, very old one That works great.

        https://www.ebay.com/itm/TEMCo-DIELE...-/381325350981
        Marc Muzzy[br]S.W. Florida [br]Anna Maria Island[br]\'81 25 \'09 suzuki 250[br]

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        • #5
          You may be able to rent a vise clamp die hydraulic operated crimpers. Piers may work but for uniform crimping pressure the vise type crimpers are best.
          Keyman[br]Paoli, PA

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          • #6
            The last 2 boats I ran battery cables on I used the ends with the soldier in them. Just heat with a torch and push the wire in. They make for a really good connection and I put good adhesive heat shrink on all my connections. I also started using welding cable instead of tinned marine battery cable. It's way more flexible and cost less.
            1978 Mako 21[br]Schneider [br]Butler, PA

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            • #7
              I like these ends also. I buy my battery cables and ends from Greg's Marine in FL. This time I actually ponied up and bought the solder pellets that drop into the pre-tinned end. Can't wait to try them!
              quote:


              Originally posted by Tinbanger1979


              The last 2 boats I ran battery cables on I used the ends with the soldier in them. Just heat with a torch and push the wire in. They make for a really good connection and I put good adhesive heat shrink on all my connections. I also started using welding cable instead of tinned marine battery cable. It's way more flexible and cost less.



              1982 Whaler Montauk 90HP( sold)[br]1977 25 Mako CC 225HP

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              • #8
                I agree that welding cable is more flexible but isn't suited for marine applications. Using tinned marine cable prevents corrosion. Using heat shrinking over the terminal ends helps prevent corrosive.. Soldering terminatons in marine application really is not advised.
                Keyman[br]Paoli, PA

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                • #9
                  I've been using this crimper for 6 or 7 years now. It has done a great job on some big battery cables. Including a relocation of batteries on a 224.

                  https://www.harborfreight.com/hydrau...ool-66150.html

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                  • #10
                    Would you be willing to share your excel sheet? I am redoing a 231 moving batteries forward as well and want to get it right. My email is [email protected]. Thank you in advance for sharing.

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                    • #11
                      Can do. Need to know what the HP is of your motor(s). Typically 150hp and above and with cable lenght calculated #2/0 wire gauge size should be ok. Prefer the Marinco BEP cluster for battery management. How many bilge pumps? List all devices you plan on for now and future. Number of batteries required motor(s) and house and sizes. Total loads determine main circuit breaker and wire gauge size requirements. Number of motor(s) and house battery determines which BEP requirements. Each Excel spreadsheet is modified to specific project requirements. Let me know at DMK one one six at comcast dot net.
                      Keyman[br]Paoli, PA

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                      • #12
                        I got a crumpet for about $30 from one of the wiring places. The crimped is a spring loaded vblock. You put the connector in it, stick the wire in the connector and smash the top of it with a sledge hammer. Makes a v on one side of the connector and dimples the other. Ive done countless car stereos and my 231 this way.
                        1989 Mako 261[br]SOLD - 1987 231 restore/rebuild http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=46836&whichpage=1[br]

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                        • #13
                          I've had extremely good luck with the solder-pellet cable connectors in off-road applications. Which is maybe the second harshest recreational application after salt water boating. The vibration and impact is comparable and the amount of dust, dirt, mud and water makes shit corrode and rust too. I've primarily used the connectors that they sell at Napa Auto Parts with HEAVY heat shrink over the connection after the solder has cured. Zero issues ever with this setup on various off road rigs.
                          Texas[br]\'76 Mako 23- A work in progress[br]

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