Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

224 Rebuild

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 224 Rebuild

    I've decided to make some changes to my 224. Yesterday I started pulling the fuel tank on my 83' 224. Since my future plans include twin outboard without a bracket, I'm looking for ways to drop and shift weight. Has anyone replaced their 122 gal. tank with 2 tanks?

    Ive been thinking about have a 80 and 40 gallon tank made. I would mount the 80 (main tank) in front of the 40. The 40 would only get filled for off shore trips and would be used first.

    Other plans to move and drop weight are.

    Move the batteries under the console, recore the fuel tank lid with a lighter composite material, disconnect the in floor livewell, raise the rear deck and splashwell to the same height as the main floor, raise the suppers and raise the transom 5-6". Change my 120lb fiberglass leaning post to a aluminum post with a removable livewell under it.

    I'm on the fence about removing the 2 rear fix boxes. If I did, I would extend the front step up at the anchor locker so that it would end about 1" in front of the forward fish box. I would add hatches to it and use it for storage. This would also give me a larger deck to throw my net from.

    Let me know what you think.
    1983 224

  • #2
    I talked to guy awhile back with a 221b for sale, and he did exactly what youve mentioned with his tank. He repowered with single 4 stroke, but was happy with decision; never even put fuel in back tank.
    \'93 241 https://forum.classicmako.com/forum/...etting-started
    \'82 224 - Mobile, AL Gone but NEVER Forgotten - https://forum.classicmako.com/forum/...indshield-tank

    Comment


    • #3
      There have been multiple builds on this site with the 224 and twins on a tub and for the most part the boat did not handle well. Why are you set on twins, how about a larger single?
      David, New Kent, Va[br]



      [br]Project Thread: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=21067[br]

      Comment


      • #4
        There is lots of room under the console for you to move the tank forward 3-4 feet. That alone would offset some weight from the back. You have to remove the coffin and build a shelf but that is not hard. There is also a lot of room in front of the fish box and anchor locker to add some storage or fresh water tank etc.

        Your twin option is interesting. Why? twin 115 is as big as you can go and it would not be as effective as a 250. Your fuel source is normally the issue on motors offshore and you will be pulling form one tank so that will not isolate any contaminated fuel. Add the maintenance cost, upfront cost and weight issues there is no reason to add twins to this boat.

        I have done most of what you want. batteries, core tank lid, live well LP, disconnect in-floor. I am still a little bow high with a single on a bracket

        Where are you located? How long have you had the boat. I have fished mine for 6 years and just removed the aft boxes. the space is incredible.
        [br]1984 Mako 224[br]1977 Mako 15[br]Clermont, Florida- [br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=37212 -Rewire[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=40627 -Tank/Misc[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=58615 - Aft Box removal

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:


          Originally posted by Triplecrownnc


          There have been multiple builds on this site with the 224 and twins on a tub and for the most part the boat did not handle well. Why are you set on twins, how about a larger single?



          While I personally wouldn't go with twins, he said "without" a bracket, and also plans to raise the transom. Many 224's originally came with twins.
          \'93 241 https://forum.classicmako.com/forum/...etting-started
          \'82 224 - Mobile, AL Gone but NEVER Forgotten - https://forum.classicmako.com/forum/...indshield-tank

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:


            Originally posted by Triplecrownnc


            There have been multiple builds on this site with the 224 and twins on a tub and for the most part the boat did not handle well. Why are you set on twins, how about a larger single?



            I want twins for peace of mind 40+ miles offshore. I am not going to use a bracket. I want to raise the transom 6" and hang 2 25" 115hp-140hp. I have read the posts involving the issues with a bracket and twins, that's why I want to mount them directly to the transom.
            1983 224

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:


              Originally posted by snappergapper


              There is lots of room under the console for you to move the tank forward 3-4 feet. That alone would offset some weight from the back. You have to remove the coffin and build a shelf but that is not hard. There is also a lot of room in front of the fish box and anchor locker to add some storage or fresh water tank etc.


              Your twin option is interesting. Why? twin 115 is as big as you can go and it would not be as effective as a 250. Your fuel source is normally the issue on motors offshore and you will be pulling form one tank so that will not isolate any contaminated fuel. Add the maintenance cost, upfront cost and weight issues there is no reason to add twins to this boat.

              I have done most of what you want. batteries, core tank lid, live well LP, disconnect in-floor. I am still a little bow high with a single on a bracket

              Where are you located? How long have you had the boat. I have fished mine for 6 years and just removed the aft boxes. the space is incredible.


              I'm in St. Petersburg. I've had the boat for about a year and a half. It came with a 200 ocean pro that got 1mpg. In April of this year I had a 225 etec installed, now I'm getting 2-2.5 mpg depending on my load and sea conditions.

              I agree with you on the fuel source usually being the problem. Last time I was offshore the motor shut off 3 times, not a great feeling 30 miles out. Every time it shut off the primer ball was collapsed. The ball was new so I know that wasn't the issue. When I removed the fuel line from the ball you could hear the suction release. I checked the vent and it was ok, the anti siphon valve was removed before I got the boat so that's not the cause. I've concluded that there has to be something in the tank that periodically gets sucked up against the pick up. That's why I am started on the tank first.
              I've tossed around the idea of a high thrust kicker motor instead of twins but I still don't like the low transom and my suppers below the water line.

              I know some guys will run a single engine 40+ miles offshore, I'm just not one of those guys unless I'm going with another boat.
              1983 224

              Comment


              • #8
                Snooking,

                I fish out there a lot. If you need a ride during construction let me know. We will support you either way you go on the motors. I will tell you I had a 15 big foot kicker on the back. I used it once when a fuel line on the carb broke. I used it for about 5 miles while replacing the line. Was nice to stay in the right direction. That bracket and motor took a beating on the transom. I can pull some old photos if you need to see it . If you need help I am only an 1.5 hrs away. I know the 224 inside and out after doing what you want to do.
                [br]1984 Mako 224[br]1977 Mako 15[br]Clermont, Florida- [br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=37212 -Rewire[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=40627 -Tank/Misc[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=58615 - Aft Box removal

                Comment


                • #9
                  Snooking,

                  I like your idea of two tanks. It gives you options for trimming that you just can't get with one tank. While reading your post, it occured to me that putting in a pair of 60's might give you more options. Also, should the front of your coffin be too shallow to provide 80, 60 might fit. Just a thought.

                  My 78, 25' has 80 rear, 40 front. Power is twin DF 140s, a littie over 800 pounds back there. Since we don't run to the edge any more, I don't top off the tanks. I found 20 gals rear and 20 gals front give me the right trim and ride for floundering around. When going to wrecks and 20 fathom lumps I start with 40 in the rear, sometimes (though seldom) 40 up front.

                  Any way you go, you will have more options.
                  Ole Joe
                  Just floundering around
                  White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                  1978 Mako 25

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:


                    Originally posted by snappergapper


                    Snooking,

                    I fish out there a lot. If you need a ride during construction let me know. We will support you either way you go on the motors. I will tell you I had a 15 big foot kicker on the back. I used it once when a fuel line on the carb broke. I used it for about 5 miles while replacing the line. Was nice to stay in the right direction. That bracket and motor took a beating on the transom. I can pull some old photos if you need to see it . If you need help I am only an 1.5 hrs away. I know the 224 inside and out after doing what you want to do.



                    Snappergapper,

                    How much does that 15hp weight? That's one of my concerns with the kicker motor. Riding offshore with a kicker tilted up has got to put some stress on the transom, or does the bracket absorb a lot of that?

                    I've seen a few posts on THT about the Yamaha 8 and 9.9hp high thrust motors. I think they are about 80lbs.

                    I've been following your fish box removal post. It looks good, the space it opened up. Just wow. I can't wait to see it finished.
                    1983 224

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:


                      Originally posted by flounder


                      Snooking,


                      I like your idea of two tanks. It gives you options for trimming that you just can't get with one tank. While reading your post, it occured to me that putting in a pair of 60's might give you more options. Also, should the front of your coffin be too shallow to provide 80, 60 might fit. Just a thought.

                      My 78, 25' has 80 rear, 40 front. Power is twin DF 140s, a littie over 800 pounds back there. Since we don't run to the edge any more, I don't top off the tanks. I found 20 gals rear and 20 gals front give me the right trim and ride for floundering around. When going to wrecks and 20 fathom lumps I start with 40 in the rear, sometimes (though seldom) 40 up front.

                      Any way you go, you will have more options.


                      Flounder,

                      That's a good point. I'm going to talk to my tank builder about it on Monday to see how much more it would be to go to two smaller tanks. They quoted me 1200.00 for the single 122.

                      I love your 25', I grew up on that model. My dad had a 81' with twin 135's. It's the reason I'm a Mako owner.
                      1983 224

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you dig up my thread and if the pictures still work...... I excavated under the console of my 224 last summer to remove the wet foam thanks to a broken fitting in the bow locker. There is a tremendous amount of wasted space directly under the console of a 224 that could be put to all sorts of creative and beneficial use. The entire footprint of the console and forward facing seat is wide open wasted space underneath and there is quite a bit of depth to it.

                        Here are two pictures that will give you an idea of the sort of wasted space under there:

                        This shot shows the depth of the space under the existing floor inside the console.



                        This shot is looking forward towards the in floor locker in the bow. It was the PVC 90* fitting coming off the bow locker drain that broke and added a couple hundred pounds of wet foam to my hull. The quality of this PVC fitting and the thin walled tubing they used was so poor that I'd bet its failed on most of these boats just like it did on mine. I'd strongly recommend that anyone doing surgery on a 224 or has their tank out for replacement take the time to open up the compartment as I did in my thread to check the foam, tubing and fitting.


                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:


                          Originally posted by mako224


                          If you dig up my thread and if the pictures still work...... I excavated under the console of my 224 last summer to remove the wet foam thanks to a broken fitting in the bow locker. There is a tremendous amount of wasted space directly under the console of a 224 that could be put to all sorts of creative and beneficial use. The entire footprint of the console and forward facing seat is wide open wasted space underneath and there is quite a bit of depth to it.


                          Here are two pictures that will give you an idea of the sort of wasted space under there:

                          This shot shows the depth of the space under the existing floor inside the console.



                          This shot is looking forward towards the in floor locker in the bow. It was the PVC 90* fitting coming off the bow locker drain that broke and added a couple hundred pounds of wet foam to my hull. The quality of this PVC fitting and the thin walled tubing they used was so poor that I'd bet its failed on most of these boats just like it did on mine. I'd strongly recommend that anyone doing surgery on a 224 or has their tank out for replacement take the time to open up the compartment as I did in my thread to check the foam, tubing and fitting.




                          Mako224,

                          Is there enough room under the console floor to mount a couple of batteries and maybe an oil tank?
                          1983 224

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            https://imgur.com/a/WITn4

                            I got the tank out today, that was fun.

                            I had to cut it short today, I had some other commitments this afternoon. Tomorrow I'm going to get in there and clean the coffin and see what I have.
                            1983 224

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Looking good. Congrats on the tank. There is plenty of space for the batteries and tank don there if you add an access and frame in a shelf.
                              [br]1984 Mako 224[br]1977 Mako 15[br]Clermont, Florida- [br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=37212 -Rewire[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=40627 -Tank/Misc[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=58615 - Aft Box removal

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X