Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Mako 236 Inboard

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    ll of the nidacore deck panels have now been glued in. They will get glassed over and faired in the next couple of days. The rear deck hatch has also been recored with 3/4" nidacore with a layer of 1708 on either side. It is substantially stronger than the old hatch and a little bit lighter.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	image_762.jpg
Views:	438
Size:	3.29 MB
ID:	542978
    Attached Files
    Last edited by trace elements; 02-25-2020, 07:56 AM.

    Comment


    • #17
      The deck is now all completely bonded and solid as a rock. It feels as though it doesn't even need the extra glass on top. Last night I filled some voids to get ready for glassing the decks. I have to drive down to Composites One to pick up some CSM and more resin, then I will get the decks finished this weekend hopefully. We have also been removing the hardware in preparation for priming in the next few weeks. I got the old scupper hoses out last night. I don't like the design of them as-is. They feature a 1'" PVC pipe passing through the deck with an elbow connecting to a piece of water hose and then out a thru-hull. I'll have to see if I can come up with something a little more robust.

      Click image for larger version

Name:	image_769.jpg
Views:	435
Size:	230.4 KB
ID:	543004Click image for larger version

Name:	image_771.jpg
Views:	402
Size:	2.18 MB
ID:	543005Click image for larger version

Name:	image_772.jpg
Views:	386
Size:	3.21 MB
ID:	543006Click image for larger version

Name:	image_773.jpg
Views:	385
Size:	3.21 MB
ID:	543007Click image for larger version

Name:	image_775.jpg
Views:	387
Size:	3.67 MB
ID:	543008
      Last edited by trace elements; 02-25-2020, 07:55 AM.

      Comment


      • llinhart
        llinhart commented
        Editing a comment
        Awesome progress!
        I'm very grateful for your sharing the project. I've got a 1976, 23 inboard with identical symptoms that I'm going to be starting on next month.
        I'm trying to figure out how to hinge and improve engine access as well. I'm look forward to your plan and ideas on it.
        What was the thickness of the nidacore/polyrmac you used on the deck? Fortunately, I've got a Composite One in Ohio not too far away.

    • #18
      I used 3/4" nidacore for the deck. This gave me enough thickness to add glue and fiberglass to it to match the existing 1-1/4" deck thickness. I think Composites One calls it "Polyumac Aircomb". It cost me $81.60 a sheet.

      Comment


      • #19
        Just an update, all of the hatches have been recored, and the deck has gotten its final layer of 1708. I will glass in the lip around the console with 1-1/2 oz mat and then the whole deck will get one layer of mat and then be finally faired. I also need to start filling the little dings and spider cracks on the topsides so that we can begin fairing this weekend. The goal is to begin spraying primer the first week of March, and paint the following week.
        Click image for larger version

Name:	image_855.jpg
Views:	413
Size:	2.42 MB
ID:	543160Click image for larger version

Name:	image_856.jpg
Views:	384
Size:	2.83 MB
ID:	543161Click image for larger version

Name:	image_857.jpg
Views:	379
Size:	2.98 MB
ID:	543162
        Last edited by trace elements; 02-25-2020, 07:54 AM.

        Comment


        • #20
          We are working on finishing up all of the fiberglass work and will start fairing the boat this weekend, hopefully. So one of the big parts of this project was modifying the console to hinge, and with a hinged console not sealed to the deck, I needed to install a lip to keep water from running under the console and into the bilge. I decided to build it out of extruded PVC trim board (Azek) and then glass it to the deck. I bought the trim board at home depot, routered the edges, and bent it to shape last night using a heat gun. Some of the radii in the corners still need a little refining, but for the most part, it was pretty painless. Next, I am going to make the rod holder trim out of Azek as well, and glass that to the hull, to eventually be painted to match the rest of the boat. I love the teak, but using the boat as much as we do, it takes a beating.

          I also and beginning to work on the console. I think I am going to take the windshield apart and try to media blast it using one of those media blasters from Harbor Freight. Then, hopefully, spray the frame with awlgrip and then reinstall the glass with new trim.

          I'll be ordering custom switch panels for the dash. There's a guy on the classic mako facebook group that makes them and they look great. I'm going to reach out to him to get a price. I'll attach a picture of the starboard panels I have now that I made last year.
          Click image for larger version  Name:	image_862.jpg Views:	65 Size:	2.05 MB ID:	543189Click image for larger version  Name:	image_863.jpg Views:	50 Size:	2.46 MB ID:	543190Click image for larger version  Name:	image_864.jpg Views:	49 Size:	2.37 MB ID:	543191Click image for larger version  Name:	image_865.jpg Views:	49 Size:	2.47 MB ID:	543192Click image for larger version  Name:	image_866.jpg Views:	51 Size:	2.49 MB ID:	543193
          Last edited by trace elements; 02-27-2020, 09:21 AM.

          Comment


          • llinhart
            llinhart commented
            Editing a comment
            You are moving quickly in less than ideal weather.
            Looking forward to your idea on the hinge/access solution on the console.
            Thanks again for documenting the project!

        • #21
          We are really gunning to be primed by March 8. The deck has been glassed and the lip glassed in. We are waiting on some fillers to arrive so we can fair the decks.

          I pulled some more hardware last night. The previous owner installed the bow cleat with carriage bolts which made removing it a bear. I don't know if anyone here has removed the stern cleats on these 236, but they are almost impossible to get to the back of. Luckily, this year when we installed the speakers, we cut the holes just close enough that I could reach in and get to the back of the cleats. The stern cleats did not even have nylock nuts on them, not sure if that's how they were originally installed, but will need to be fixed, nonetheless. I'm still trying to design a solution for the scuppers. I do not like the existing installation and well keep looking for other ways of doing it. Just eating the elephant.

          Click image for larger version  Name:	Image 70 - test fitting hatches.JPG Views:	11 Size:	2.27 MB ID:	543252Click image for larger version  Name:	Image 73 - fwd cleat.JPG Views:	11 Size:	2.81 MB ID:	543253Click image for larger version  Name:	Image 71 - deck CSM.JPG Views:	11 Size:	2.87 MB ID:	543254
          Attached Files
          Last edited by trace elements; 02-27-2020, 09:21 AM.

          Comment


          • #22
            So this weekend I didn't get nearly as much sanding done as I wanted to, but you never end up getting done as much as you hope do you? This weekend I got the console taken apart and removed the couple pf small sections of core. They were all water-logged and I don't think they added much to the strength of the console. I also took the windshield off and now I have to take it apart and prep it for paint. Probably going to paint it awlgrip snow white to match the rest of the boat. You'll also see a picture of the rod holder boxes on the side of the boat. They had a small void that was holding water and getting nasty with a bunch of unexplained holes drilled. So I filled the voids and am glassing over the holes to give it a cleaner look. I got some fairing done on the deck as well and filled a bunch of holes. Fairing will continue this week. We are still aiming to have the boat primed by the end of this coming weekend. We shall see.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 74 - fillers from us composites.JPG
Views:	320
Size:	3.75 MB
ID:	543304Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 75 - console coring.JPG
Views:	317
Size:	3.15 MB
ID:	543303Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 77 - console disassembled.JPG
Views:	313
Size:	4.87 MB
ID:	543305Click image for larger version

Name:	IMage 78 - void in fish box.JPG
Views:	320
Size:	1.96 MB
ID:	543302Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2312.JPG
Views:	312
Size:	1.86 MB
ID:	543306
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #23
              The tanks run about $8/ gal. Depending on location. Sunshine tanks in Miami is a source.

              Comment


              • #24
                So this weekend consisted of just a lot of sanding. All the sanding and fairing takes forever so we don't have much to show. However, we fitted the new console over our lip, and removed the rub rail. It is very hard taking a sander to a hull with good gelcoat!
                Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 84 - bow sanding 2.JPG
Views:	303
Size:	1.85 MB
ID:	543427

                Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 83 - bow sanding.JPG
Views:	274
Size:	2.11 MB
ID:	543428
                Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 86 - console fitting.JPG
Views:	284
Size:	2.11 MB
ID:	543429Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 85 - console fitting.JPG
Views:	295
Size:	2.91 MB
ID:	543430

                Comment


                • #25
                  Last night I removed the thru-hull for the bilge pump to make way for a larger fitting for a larger pump. We will also be adding one or two more pumps. The thru-hull had a rotted plywood packing plate and was installed with silicone in a hole that was too big for the thru-hull. It also had a plastic elbow on it. I'll be replacing them with Gemlux 90-degree thru-hulls. I also am glassing in all of the holes in the transom for the bilge blower vents and the stern light to relocate them and mount a new stern light. The original stern light had a huge cutout, and ai don't feel like trying to track down an original and refurbish it, so the holes got filled.

                  Also, we are going to have to start replacing some items on the engine as it will hopefully go back in within the next couple of weeks. On the list we have the oil pan, trans cooler, motor mounts, and maybe the oil cooler. I'll have to put the gantry back together to lift the motor while I replace the mounts but that's no big deal. I've never replaced an oil pan, but in reading, it doesn't sound like that bad of a job. I guess we'll see.

                  Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 91 - bilge blower vents.JPG
Views:	288
Size:	1.84 MB
ID:	543441Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 88 - bilge pump thru hull.JPG
Views:	257
Size:	2.69 MB
ID:	543443Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 90 - plastic elbow 2.JPG
Views:	258
Size:	3.43 MB
ID:	543444Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 89 - plastic elbow.JPG
Views:	258
Size:	3.55 MB
ID:	543445Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 87 - rustred oil pan.JPG
Views:	261
Size:	2.62 MB
ID:	543442

                  Comment


                  • #26
                    So we are still sanding and it appears we may have slightly underestimated the amount of fairing required to completely paint a boat. However, the end is near and we are almost ready to start spraying. We decided on seafoam green and will most likely copy the paint scheme from Jimmy Buffet's Freeman. All of the awlgrip is ordered and some other supplies are on their way, just in case we end up quarantined here for a few days!

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 92 - Fairing hull.JPG
Views:	248
Size:	1.87 MB
ID:	543543
                    Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 93 - fairing transom.JPG
Views:	253
Size:	2.74 MB
ID:	543541

                    Click image for larger version

Name:	Image 94 - jimmy buffet's freeman.PNG
Views:	256
Size:	1.84 MB
ID:	543542
                    Attached Files

                    Comment


                    • llinhart
                      llinhart commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Great to see forging ahead, thanks for the continuing inspiration!
                      I like your idea of the Trex curb laminated around the motor well. Do you think you got good adhesion between the glass and the Trex? Any secret to making that work?
                      If I'm able to replicate your idea, I would consider fastening the console through the Trex to reduce the possibility of water intrusion in the deck. My thought is to reduce the through holes, which took out my deck. Perhaps the Nidacore makes that a non-issue.
                      Are you still planning on hinging the console to improving motor access?

                    • trace elements
                      trace elements commented
                      Editing a comment
                      It actually wasn't too hard to get the trex (PVC board) to adhere to the deck. It is tabbed in with a couple of layers of glass and we have been walking all over it and haven't seen any bonding issues yet. We roughed the trex up really well with 60 grit to help the glass really bond to it.

                      We will hinge the console form the deck to maintain the lip around the bottom of the console. The console could be made to hinge from this lip if you were to remove the lip around the bottom of the console or figured something more clever out than me.

                      We should have no water intrusion issues in the new deck, however, nidacore does't hold screws well so we have to cut out the recesses for the hinges, build up a thickness of glass for the hinge to land on, and then add an aluminum backing plate on the underside of the deck.

                  • #27
                    I overlooked your request concerning fuel tank pricing, but want to share some info. It may be too late, but...

                    Six months ago I found prices running $15 to $18 per gallon FOB the fabricator. The tanks quoted were 1/8" 5052 marine aluminum. The quotes included epoxy coating. Freight gets expensive fast, so if you can have them built locally, your savings can be substantial.

                    You have a couple fabricators in New Jersey. They both popped up on a Google search. I only contacted one of them because he was reccomended to me. The one I spoke with was Atlantic Coatal Welding, Bayville, NJ, 800-434-8265.

                    Hope this helps.
                    Last edited by flounder; 03-23-2020, 08:29 AM.
                    Ole Joe
                    Just floundering around
                    White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                    1978 Mako 25

                    Comment


                    • #28
                      I'm restoring one of these as well, but mine's a 1975. Huge pain in the butt as that year had above-deck tanks. I paid two arms and three legs for mine and had to design them myself.

                      I ended up with two 80 gallon saddle tanks.. What I'm trying to figure out now is a way to keep them relatively equal without having to dick around with switching back and forth all day.
                      Last edited by TBrown; 03-20-2020, 07:32 PM.
                      [img=left]https://i.imgur.com/b1nW04t.jpg?2[/img=left][br]1975 23 Inboard [br]Chesapeake, VA[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=59930

                      Comment


                      • #29
                        In order to keep the tank levels at about the same, I would try to keep the length of hose running from the tanks to the engine the same length and about at the same height. Changes in the height of the run will increase or decrease the head in either fuel line causing them to flow unevenly.

                        Comment


                        • #30
                          What if you run a single line from the engine back to a tee that is set mid way between and above the tank pick up tubes?
                          I should think the tee would equalize the pull out of the tanks.
                          In addition, if it were mine, I'd put shut off valves on both sides of the tee in order to isolate one tank or the other in the event a tank is contaminated or fails. The valves could be attached to the tank pick-ups and accessible through deck plates which I want to have above the tank pick-up fixtures. The tee could be located at a high point under the deck which could be serviced through the hatch behind the console.
                          Last edited by flounder; 03-23-2020, 08:30 AM.
                          Ole Joe
                          Just floundering around
                          White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                          1978 Mako 25

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X