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17' Rebuild---Rebuild

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  • 17' Rebuild---Rebuild

    My other thread was all over the place, because I wasn't intending a complete rebuild [B)] This is a 1977 17' Mako that will be rebuilt 'from the ground up.' I will be using 3:1 FGCI Lam. Epoxy for the build.







    Stringers are all shot - will be replaced with 2" polyurethane foam. I will go with a grid.

    Transom was worm food all around the trim tabs and mounting hardware. No sealant! Transom core will be the standard 1.5" of marine grade plywood.

    Sole will go on top of the 2" lip with stringer support under - not sure on plywood or nidacore.





    Epoxy fillet followed by tape wet on wet.

    I'm picking up the plywood tomorrow. I hope to get it all set this week, so I can put it in this weekend. [] This is the first time I have used epoxy(on a boat). Wow! I always thought it was hype... I did have 12oz go off to soon [!]I don't think I did a good job mixing. I need to mix it like I do with rod building. Stupid me![B)]

  • #2
    i've use epoxy exclusively on both of my projects. tho i've never used any of the esters i can do without the fumes and i like not having to worry about the secondary bond.
    Grant[br]87 21b 97 Suzuki DT200[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23633[br]New Orleans, LA[br][email protected]

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    • #3
      How bad was your tank? From the pics it looks like the original. What are your planes for your fuel system. I’m having a new tank made for my 17. I wish I could find a polyethylene tank that would give me more capacity but it’s not going to happen. [xx(] I’m going to have to go with aluminum.

      I’ll treat the tank and I won’t be foaming it in. I feel confident it will last a good 5 to 10 years. If I keep this boat 5 years I’ll be surprised. Having the tank max out I should get 30 gal when it’s done. Just removed all the foam and measured the coffin. Good luck with your project.

      Daveid="blue">
      1978 Mako 17 Standerd[br]1990 Welcraft 33 Sportfish 2000 14 Polar Craft

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      • #4
        quote:


        Originally posted by Diamond Dave


        How bad was your tank?

        Dave
        id="blue">



        I had a replacement made - If I knew I was going to go through all this work I would have put a 35-40 in. I still might have a 5-10gal res. tank. 24gal is pretty small for what I want to do.

        I'll be stopping in at FGCI for some wood on the way home.

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        • #5
          That looks great. Keep the pictures coming. Youre making great progress.
          1971 17 Standard[br]Clemson SC

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          • #6
            I'm going to glue my core together after work. Any tips?

            Wet out both pieces of wood and glass(1.5oz) with straight epoxy - Then make some "epoxy" glue (Epoxy, milled fibers, wood flour...put it all together and set some blocks on it or dry wall screw together...

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            • #7
              actually the mat will act as a filler. wet out the wood on the sides you're going to join and let the resin gel. then wet out the mat and join the core. i would use something heavy to sit on them. remember you don't want to squeeze all of the resin out. using the mat you eliminate the step of making the 'glue'. the important thing is to get the surface of the wood saturated and sealed so that it will not wick the resin from the mat and give you a 'dry' bond. use the thickened epoxy on the transom skin to fill any voids the mat will not. with the flat pieces of wood there shouldn't be many voids. unless of course you like overkill! [:x)]
              Grant[br]87 21b 97 Suzuki DT200[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23633[br]New Orleans, LA[br][email protected]

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              • #8
                quote:


                Originally posted by grantn


                actually the mat will act as a filler. wet out the wood on the sides you're going to join and let the resin gel. then wet out the mat and join the core. i would use something heavy to sit on them. remember you don't want to squeeze all of the resin out. using the mat you eliminate the step of making the 'glue'. the important thing is to get the surface of the wood saturated and sealed so that it will not wick the resin from the mat and give you a 'dry' bond. use the thickened epoxy on the transom skin to fill any voids the mat will not. with the flat pieces of wood there shouldn't be many voids. unless of course you like overkill! [:x)]



                Thanks! It's clear now!

                How thick should I make the glue when I bond the core to the skin...Should it be like Peanut butter since it's on a somewhat vertical surface?

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                • #9
                  yes, but you would want to use a notched spreader to put it on. vertical or horizontal when using the resin this way (or any other adhesive for that matter) you want it the consistency of peanut butter. this will let it spread without 'running'. anything thinner and you have the bonded material pushing out all of the mixture and sitting flatter on the substrate with less of the adhesive there for bonding. what you want is a layer that will coat the entire surface of both parts and leave enough thickness (but not too thick) to let the adhesive do its job. you will also want to coat the side of the plywood with straight resin (for same reasons as before) and let it tack before putting it against the thickened mixture.

                  again here (some of the more experienced hands may want to add their wisdom) you may want to lay up a piece of mat on the face of the ply wood before laying it on the fiberglass coated with the thickened resin. the mat will give a near 100% adhesion surface to the wood and then 'absorb' the thickened resin into it giving a much more thorough bond to the fiberglass. and again, this may be overkill, but.........[]
                  Grant[br]87 21b 97 Suzuki DT200[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23633[br]New Orleans, LA[br][email protected]

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                  • #10
                    Well I got the transom core. I was able to get both pieces out of 1 sheet of Marine Tech. I put the epoxy in the frige before using it and didn't waste any. []



                    A guy is flipping the house next to me must have 30 blocks he is trying to dump. I put a few to use. I'll use a bunch when I get the floor in......when ever that is.



                    I had some left over PT so I used it for the clamps. Pre-pouring everything into small containers and puting them in the frige really made this go quick! I'll clean everything up and run some fillets this week. I hope I can get the glass laid next weekend.


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                    • #11
                      hey ryan, hows the project coming alone?
                      Chewy[br]1972 17\' Mako[br]1988 115 Yamaha[br]S. Tampa, FL

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                      • #12
                        quote:


                        Originally posted by chewy


                        hey ryan, hows the project coming alone?



                        I took the clamps off early in the week. That epoxy is crazy strong! Broke a couple of bolts getting that bad boy off. You could build a boat or space ship out of epoxy and duct tape [:x)]

                        Cut my 3 layers of 1808 yesterday. I think this is the one time that a smaller boat was tuffer to do. All those cuts in a tight area. I'm going to fillet/glass the inner side tomorrow after work.

                        I will be using 2" polyurethane foam board for the stringers (thanks Rick). I'll cut one out of the boat this weekend. Looks like more time in the Tyvek suit Can't wait to get a sub 85° day....

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                        • #13
                          I redid that exact same model boat, except mine was a '78. I did not want to hijack your thread, so I threw some pics up: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=19077

                          I plan on doing a Mako 20, but I am waiting until January and the cooler weather.
                          1987 Mako 254, 2013 Evinrude ETEC 175\'s (sold to my buddy)[br]1988 Mako 20, 2008 Yamaha 200HPDI (sold)[br]1984 Mako 17, 2005 Suzuki 115 (sold)[br]1981 Mako 21 (sold)[br]1978 Mako 17 (sold)[br]1986 Mako 260 (sold)[br]1997 Mako 232 (sold)[br]Tampa, Florida

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                          • #14
                            All the charts for the FGCI 3:1 Epoxy are based on 77°. Last night it was 77° [8D] Milled fibers and some "filler" followed by 3 layers of 1808.....and some "extra" tabbing on the sides.... I was flying!!!



                            Clean this up and add some 1.5oz to finish it off...stringers here I come...[]

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                            • #15
                              That transom looks really good. []
                              1987 Mako 254, 2013 Evinrude ETEC 175\'s (sold to my buddy)[br]1988 Mako 20, 2008 Yamaha 200HPDI (sold)[br]1984 Mako 17, 2005 Suzuki 115 (sold)[br]1981 Mako 21 (sold)[br]1978 Mako 17 (sold)[br]1986 Mako 260 (sold)[br]1997 Mako 232 (sold)[br]Tampa, Florida

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