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  • re-wiring batteries

    Well, I decided to move my batteries to the center console on my 79' 21. I was using 4 ga wire on my current setup. I went yesterday and bought 17' of 2 ga red, and black. $128.00 worth[:0] Anyways, I hope I made the right choice of wire size. I asked 2 marine mechanics and both told me 2 ga was plenty for the length I needed.
    [br][br]

  • #2
    I used 2 ga. to move my batteries under the console on my 20' Grady. The lenght was about the same as you describe and I have not experienced any problems whatsoever.

    There is a write up about the entire process on my site if your curious. It's under Project 1.

    That's wire is expensive isn't it! [][][:0]

    Good luck.

    Brian

    1985 Grady White 204

    http://w3.mivlmd.cablespeed.com/~brianm/
    Brian[br]St. Leonard, MD

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    • #3
      2 awg sounds fine for the task. Thats on my to-do list as well, but no sense in doing it right now.


      Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

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      • #4
        []I feel better now. I should have it finished tomorrow. Cant wiat to crank it up again. I am also about to change the impeller..96 225 rude ocean pro. Never done it before...may need help[]
        [br][br]

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        • #5
          Make sure you use good thick copper lugs onthe ends and crimp the hell out of them. I usually crimp first and then put the cable/lug on an anvil and give it a good whack with a hammer too. Then I cover the end completely with that thick heat shrink tubing with the adhesive on the inside.


          Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

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          • #6
            You bet. I used the heavy ancor ends with the adhesive shrink. I used West marines crimper. Hey Ringleader, sorry the splash gate thing didnt work out. I was really looking foward to getting it, But apparently mine is different than yours. Were you ever able to sell it?
            [br][br]

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            • #7
              Yes, I sold it to a fellow Mako Owner in South Carolina along with the 2 above deck fishbox lids.


              Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

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              • #8
                solder those ends then use hard heat shrink.

                Mako 224 The Best 22 foot Fishing Layout on the Planet!!!!


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                • #9
                  Soldering will be good... though, use an industrial solder pencil/gun not a blow torch. The torch will create too much heat and break down the OFC of the wire as well as the sheathing. (OFC = oxygen free copper - most high quality wire is done with this now)

                  I find crimping is actually real easy (on these big lugs) with a nice 4" vice (especially if you have metal shaping dies for it).

                  Personally I crimp first then dribble solder into the lugs.

                  2AWG, however is MORE than enough as long as you don't hold down your starter for longer than a 60 sec's at a time (this would of course burn the starter or strip the pinion).

                  Just make sure that whatever distributon block you use is also up to the task.

                  -Pat.

                  18ft MonArk tri-hull: 140HP Mercruiser Alpha One

                  (I know it's not a Mako, but hey, its mine!)

                  Time's fun when you're having flies!
                  18ft MonArk tri-hull: 140HP Mercruiser Alpha One - still in pieces...to be continued[br](I know it\'s not a Mako, but hey, its mine!)[br] Time\'s fun when you\'re having flies![br]president/hostmaster:[br]P.Ring Technologies[br]Cornerstone IT, LLC[br]LOUISIANA WEB HOST, LLC.[br]CompTIA Certified Professional A+/Network+ // Microsoft Registered Partner

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                  • #10
                    Has anyone had any luck with welding cable ? I have asked a bunch of the 'old timers' around here and they swear by it. Moving the batteries is about #15 on my to-do list, but I will get there someday....lol.[B)]
                    James Havanki[br]Great Mills[br]Southern Maryland[br]1973 22\' still \"in-work\".......lol

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                    • #11
                      Hank, welding cable is great stuff and really cheap too. It has a very fine strand and carries current very well. Pat (cyclops) and I used nothing but welding cable back in our high powered car audio days.

                      The problem is that its not marine rated cable, and I don't know if that really matters is the larger cables.... I don't know if the expensive cable you buy at the marine stores is tin-coated copper and etc. Maybe someone else will know more.


                      Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

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                      • #12
                        This is from Anchor Cable site.

                        Unlike welding cable or SAE wire, Ancor Marine Grade™ battery cables feature quality to last years.

                        * Tinned copper stranding for maximum protection against corrosion and electrolysis

                        * Ultra flexible (type 3) stranding resists fatigue due to vibration and flexing

                        * Premium vinyl insulation that resist salt water, battery acid, oil, gas and UV

                        * Rated at 600V and 105° C

                        * Heavy duty insulation, resistant to heat and abrasion

                        * Exceeds all UL 1426, USCG Charterboart (CFR Title 46) and ABYC standards

                        * Sold by the foot up to 50' (standard pack)

                        * Also sold in 25' spools, as indicated

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                        • #13
                          My methog for soldering the lugs on is very simple and it has never failed me. Simply clamp the lug in a vice and heat it with a torch until you can fill the end of the lug with molten solder. Then slowly press the cable into the lug. The cable will actually wick up the solder as you push it in and create a bond that will never fail. I then heat shrink.

                          All of the cables on my boat are made from welding cable and I only use tinned lugs.

                          Warthog...Anchor puts information like that out there because they want you to buy their cable. Is tinned wire better, absolutely. Does the slight difference in cost and longevity warrant me spending alot of extra money, no! Heck, 10 years from now I will either have moved on to another boat or reconfigured this one several times over. For example my current battery cables are only one season old but this winter I am planning to move my batteries to the console if I don't get bogged down on something else and I will end up cutting these ones up and adding some new cables from the battery switch to the motor.

                          Mako 224 The Best 22 foot Fishing Layout on the Planet!!!!


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                          • #14
                            The only original thing I left on my 76 25 was welding cable where the batterys are in the console. Every other piece of wire or hardware was replaced but the battery cables where just fine, the guy I bought it from was the original owner so I would say that 27 years is pretty good testimonial that welding cable will last.[]

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                            • #15
                              The welding cable is great stuff. However, it is not rated resistant to UV and many petrol-based chemicals (in most cases). As it does have to meet standards of safety in industrial applications where the environment may be very tough, it will hold up to many tortures found in the marine environment. Salt, however, will corrode most types of standard welding cable (unless the sheathing states a code for OFC or tin plating).

                              My opinion (after experience) is that the welding cable is a great bet as long as you have it protected (softer outer sheath) in a conduit and any part that is exposed can be protected with "Liquid Electrical Tape" (~$4/can) and heat shrink tubing (~$1/5ft).

                              .....this reminds me... I have 25ft of #2 welding cable from one of my car audio creations still... and I have to rewire my own boat... hmmmmmm...... good idea![8D] []

                              -Pat.

                              18ft MonArk tri-hull: 140HP Mercruiser Alpha One

                              (I know it's not a Mako, but hey, its mine!)

                              Time's fun when you're having flies!
                              18ft MonArk tri-hull: 140HP Mercruiser Alpha One - still in pieces...to be continued[br](I know it\'s not a Mako, but hey, its mine!)[br] Time\'s fun when you\'re having flies![br]president/hostmaster:[br]P.Ring Technologies[br]Cornerstone IT, LLC[br]LOUISIANA WEB HOST, LLC.[br]CompTIA Certified Professional A+/Network+ // Microsoft Registered Partner

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