Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Slight stringer rot at drains - best options for s

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Slight stringer rot at drains - best options for s

    Hello everyone,

    My boat is in great shape and not to the point of needed a full restoration quite yet. That being said there are a couple areas where holes were drilled in the stringers that were left unsealed. The wood has not turned to mush but it's definitely wet and merits some attention. I was wondering what the best practices were to prevent further damage and also have some questions.

    My plan was to overdrill the holes, grind as much wet wood as I can, dry as much as I can, and fill with epoxy/fiberglass cloth as best as I can.

    Questions:

    Let's say it's a 1" drain hole through the stringer, would I lose strength if I overdrill this to 2" to try to get to better wood/bigger radius for laying glass?

    Best practices to use epoxy "peanut butter" and fiberglass cloth to seal?

    What can I use to dry the wood? dehumidifier and alcohol?

    Whats the preferred tool to get some of the wood out, a dremel?
    1981 15\' Boston Whaler, 1987 MidOcean 26, 1973 22\' Mako (Hull+trailer for sale)

  • #2
    If you have enough room cut a foot of stringer out and replace it. I think it's easier in the long run.

    Comment


    • #3
      Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it's not the content of the stringer that provide stiffness to the hull, but the shape of the fiberglass that encapsulates the wood. The wood is only the mold used to create the stringer--once that fiberglass tube cures and bonds to the hull, the inner wood is no longer really needed. Thus, if your stringer has a little rot, probably not a big deal.
      NYC & L.I. - 1974 \"Classic\" Mako 20\' - Suzuki 2006 DF150 - Fly & Light Tackle, C&R[br]My boat: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23444#159594[br]Personal website: http://www.georgemcauliffe.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        That is my understanding as well but I see no reason why I should allow the rot to continue. Plus the drains aren't flush with the hull so water is getting trapped and I would rather it be dry when on trailer.

        As for cutting the whole thing I will have to take a look. I think I am a bit tight on space for something like that. Do you have any threads where someone has done that before? I'm curious how much of a scarf and how much glass needs to go on top to keep it strong.
        1981 15\' Boston Whaler, 1987 MidOcean 26, 1973 22\' Mako (Hull+trailer for sale)

        Comment


        • #5
          I"m with gmcauliffe, but not an expert on the matter. I would try to dry them out with a strong fan as best as possible to see if you can get them dry enough to take epoxy or some other bedding material and then I would sleeve them with PVC and go fishing. You can either sleeve a round piece or cut it into a C and make it flat at the bottom to promote drainage.

          If you have to remove some core, then a nail bent at a right angle on a drill will dig stuff out quickly.
          1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog
          1985 Mako 20c - sold
          Fort Walton Beach, FL
          http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=42841

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:


            Originally posted by gmcauliffe


            Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I think it's not the content of the stringer that provide stiffness to the hull, but the shape of the fiberglass that encapsulates the wood. The wood is only the mold used to create the stringer--once that fiberglass tube cures and bonds to the hull, the inner wood is no longer really needed. Thus, if your stringer has a little rot, probably not a big deal.



            Actually not true in most cases. The wood is part of the composite that makes it stronger and actually lighter. You don't have to use as much glass. The reason for cored hulls.

            But there was so much glass used in the earlier boats that you could probably remove the wood and wouldn't have a problem.

            OP: I assume these are the limber holes? I had the same problem with the 78 I had. I would open them slightly and try to dry them out. Where are you located? Do you have an off season? I would remove all standing water and open up covers and hatches. If it dosesn't completely dry out then I would seal it with a good caulk and go boating.
            2007 Everglades 243 250 Suzuki[br]1988 201 Yamaha 200 - Sold[br]1990 261 T/200 SWS - Sold[br]1978 25 225 Johnson - Sold[br]1975 20 85 Merc - Sold[br]Jacksonville, FL[br]

            Comment


            • #7
              When I took mine out water ran along the entire length of the center stringer. It actually had a bit of a void from the rot. You may not need the wood, but you certainly don't need a long sponge either.

              Comment

              Working...
              X