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Why is a 260, 28 feet long?

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  • Why is a 260, 28 feet long?

    I have a 260. Love the boat, but always have people saying it looks longer than 26 feet. I know it's 28, but wondering why Mako called it a 260.
    Rick Loszewski[br]Derry, NH

  • #2
    They didnt include the pulpit length in the measurement which is something i wish manufacturers were still doing.
    John[br]1989 Mako 210 (Sold and Missed)[br]

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    • #3
      quote:


      Originally posted by DirtyOar


      They didnt include the pulpit length in the measurement which is something i wish manufacturers were still doing.



      I "think: it's almost 30 with the pulpit.
      Rick Loszewski[br]Derry, NH

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      • #4
        You will save money for storage/dockage

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        • #5
          I never actually measured but just assumed the hull was 26 from tip to transom. Could have also measured from the water line, a lot of manufacturers from my understanding used to play with how they measured boats to allow them to fish in other ska levels in tournaments. Take the contenders 23T vs the 23 open. Both are called 23 boats but the 23t is actually over 25 long. Hopefully someone with one chimes in as to where they got the measurements from
          John[br]1989 Mako 210 (Sold and Missed)[br]

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          • #6
            The water line measurement theory might be it. The boat has a 8 1/2 foot beam, so it is narrow for a 28..... I guess. haha. It is trailerable though.
            Rick Loszewski[br]Derry, NH

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            • #7
              quote:


              Originally posted by umachme


              You will save money for storage/dockage



              Most places want your LOA including platform/pulpit.
              1975 Mako 26 Inboard[br]1976 Mako 23 Inboard[br]1984 Rhodes 19[br]Padanaram, MA

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              • #8
                Depends on the place. My Grady storage is based on the registration.

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                • #9
                  boats used to be measured by waterline length, then marketing people got involved.....
                  1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog
                  1985 Mako 20c - sold
                  Fort Walton Beach, FL
                  http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=42841

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                  • #10
                    I have heard that they called it the 260 to keep it separate from the 284/285/286 models that were wider.
                    Columbus, Georgia[br]1973 Mako 17 angler \"Reel\'s Angler\"

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                    • #11
                      Industry standard - Measurement is always at the water line

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                      • #12
                        Is your 260 a bracket/eurotransom model? When brackets and then even eurotransoms were first added they were not included in model names by many manufacturers including Mako. I thought the original 261/260s were 26, but kept the numerical model designation even with the closed transom and bracket?

                        I dont ever remember waterline length being industry standard. Reggie Fountain would have had to subtract 5 from every model they had. Lots of companies had some sort of 23T for a 25ish boat that was meant to meet SKA requirements, but those always seemed to be the only ones using waterline.

                        Including the pulpit in the model name is just ridiculous, even though companies do it.
                        Sold the 17\', moved to FL... I need a new handle.[br]1991 Jupiter 31, current project[br]2005 Everglades 243, sold[br]2012 Contender 23 Open sold[br]1989 Intrepid 246 WA--gone to Australia[br]1973 Mako 17--sold with regrets[br]1992 Mako 17--started it all[br]Pompano, FL

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                        • #13
                          quote:


                          Originally posted by jsherlax36


                          Industry standard - Measurement is always at the water line



                          Not trying to be a smart ass... but Mako numbering was always a bit odd.

                          I find it funny that my 1992 221B later changed to the 232 in 1995. My 1988 224 was also essentially a 23 yet always a 224. I get the waterline measure.... but when we used to dry/rack store the boat, they measured the damn things and they always came in at just shy of 24' bow to transom and the Bracket boats longer, obviously.
                          Luis V.[br]1992 Mako 221B & 2018 Evinrude E-Tec G2 250 HO

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                          • #14
                            I had a 260 for several years. Great boat. One year it was was hauled for winter storage and coincidentally blocked next to a 261 center console.

                            I measured both boats. Not including the pulpit, the 260 was definitely 2 feet longer (28 feet). It was almost 30 feet including the pulpit.

                            The 261 was 26 feet long.
                            2003 Pursuit 3070 Offshore CC/Walkaround, 2013 F250\'s[br]1989 Mako 260, Twin 200-HO E-Tec\'s (Sold)[br]Philadelphia/Margate NJ[br]

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                            • #15
                              quote:


                              Originally posted by Texas 17


                              Is your 260 a bracket/eurotransom model? When brackets and then even eurotransoms were first added they were not included in model names by many manufacturers including Mako. I thought the original 261/260s were 26, but kept the numerical model designation even with the closed transom and bracket?


                              I dont ever remember waterline length being industry standard. Reggie Fountain would have had to subtract 5 from every model they had. Lots of companies had some sort of 23T for a 25ish boat that was meant to meet SKA requirements, but those always seemed to be the only ones using waterline.

                              Including the pulpit in the model name is just ridiculous, even though companies do it.


                              Funny, the first thing that popped into my mind when I read the tittle was Reggie Fountain...
                              Steven Kwajalein Atoll, RMI

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