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Installing new garboard style drain plug

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  • Installing new garboard style drain plug

    Does anyone have or have already figured out way of installing a new drain plug or garboard style plug. I noticed that these drains have a lip that goes into the existing 1" drain on the transom. My concern without is there will be a little bid of water sitting in the small area until it naturally evaps which could cause rot in the brass tube faster. Any ideas?

    If you all have trouble understanding let me know, i'll try to draw something up.

  • #2
    Here is a quick drawing of what I am referring to. This of course is using a garboard drain set up.


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    • #3
      Most of us have removed the brass sleeve and epoxied a 1" PVC sleeve in place. The new brass garboard assembly is then installed using 4200 or 5200 3M caulk and brass screws to hold it in place. Comment if you trailer you could install a chromed assembly..
      Keyman[br]Paoli, PA

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      • #4
        quote:


        Originally posted by keyman


        Most of us have removed the brass sleeve and epoxied a 1" PVC sleeve in place. The new brass garboard assembly is then installed using 4200 or 5200 3M caulk and brass screws to hold it in place. Comment if you trailer you could install a chromed assembly..



        Im looking at going with the Gemlux drain plug assembly on my rebuild.

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        • #5
          The lip is no big deal and any amount of water would evaporate any ways. As keyman said, most of us have sleeved it with pvc and then installed a garboard plug. Not sure I would install a gemlux one with a brass sleeve due to the dissimilar metals.
          1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog
          1985 Mako 20c - sold
          Fort Walton Beach, FL
          http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=42841

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          • #6
            I drilled a hole through the bottom of the boat and installed the drain on the inside of the boat. The bottom is 3/4" thick. I used a forstner type bit to set the flange of the drain into the glass so it is flush on the inside and used filler to make it flush on the outside.

            I never have standing water in my bilge.
            \'07 Mako 19 bay, sold[br]\'76 Mako 21, sold[br]\'77 Mako 21, dump[br]\'77 Mako 22, sold[br]\'80 Mako 23 WA, sold[br]\'82 Mako 21, sold[br]\'85 Mako 254 currently[br]\'78 J24 USA 292 (sold)[br]\'05 Melges 32 racing sailboat

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            • #7
              After I turned out the brass sleeve trying to get my plug out, I dried the transom core and coated it with epoxy before installing the garboard drain.
              Chris Miller[br]Mystic Islands, NJ[br]1974 17 Classic[br]1988 211 Classic (sold)[br]1990 Grady White 230 Gulfstream (sold)[br][img][br]

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              • #8
                Thanks for the replies. I haven't drilled the hole yet of where I plan on putting the new drain hole so the brass fitting will not be installed this time. I will go with the pvc pipe. Has anyone ever had issues with using a well epoxied pvc sleeve in place of the brass?

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                • #9
                  you can do either. The brass is just what is the simplest to install from a manufacter standpoint. So as long as the plug has a nice solid fitting. I assume you mean you are going to epoxy the outer skin of the PVC tube into the hole? Just be sure you get a good seal/bond between the 2 and you should be good.

                  Would hate to see that PVC tube fall out someday.

                  The other way is using 4200 (or 5200 since you'll probably never take that brass tube out, and get a nice good seal/bond between the brass tube and the hull. It's fine to use a good amount, do not be skimpy, but at the same time, too much will make a mess.

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