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1981 Mako 21

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  • 1981 Mako 21

    Im removing the fuel tank on my 1981 mako 213 and need some advise. I have already chainsawed all the way around the tank at about 12in deep so as not the start chainsawing into the base of the coffin box. I first tried to remove it by attaching a thick rope around the back two brackets (I unscrewed all the brackets obviously) and used a come along attached to a crow bar/ makeshift A frame but ended up bending the brackets.

    I have since scraped out more foam with chisels, a very large drill bit, and the chainsaw, just about as much as I can. I tried attaching the comealong to the intake but it started to bend so i stopped. My last Idea was the attach it to the forward two brackets but dont want to break them because then Im really screwed. Is there anything more I should be doing?
    Stamford, CT[br]\'81 Mako 21[br]Project Thread: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=59462[br]

  • #2
    Do yourself a favor and go to the store and buy a $40 hand grinder with a metal cutting wheel. Put some water in the gas tank and cut around the top of the tank. Should take about 10 minutes to cut the top of the tank off..take your time and don't push too hard or you will heat up the aluminum. It does not spark but can get hot. After you remove the lid, cut down the sides and across the bottom, be careful about the water with the electric grinder. You should have the tank out in about 20 minutes. I did that to the tank in my dads 192 after fighting with foam for 2 hours. His was my 3rd tank pull. I was not even thinking about trying to save the tank so I cut it up.
    Chris Miller[br]Mystic Islands, NJ[br]1974 17 Classic[br]1988 211 Classic (sold)[br]1990 Grady White 230 Gulfstream (sold)[br][img][br]

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    • #3
      I couldnt get mine out until i put some wood across the the deck and used a floor jack. Tied a rope around the brackets and it popped right up. It kind of pulled the tank upwards and slightly towards the stern, maybe thats what helped break the foam seal.
      1991 221 w/ 225 yamaha[br]Margate NJ[br]221 Fuel tank/rewire[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=58899

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      • #4
        Before you attach anything to the tank tabs, cut a length of 2 x 4 to fit between the pairs of tabs. This way when you pull up on the tabs they don't bend in and break off. Did this on my 21 tank removal. I used a handsaw (old wood saw) to cut down to the bottom of the tub through all the foam. Then, stead pressure (might have to sit for a little while under pressure) and it should pop.

        -John
        Weir Mako 21[br]1985 21B[br]Project 21B [br] http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=32089[br]Project 25 Contender [br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?whichpage=1&TOPIC_ID=55759 [br][br]

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        • #5
          Hey thanks for all the advice.

          I tried the 2x4 method but my bracket still ripped off. After doing more research on the site I decided the just punch two fist sized holes in the tank and run a cable through the holes. I attached my come along to the cable and cranked it right out. 4 days of frustration over!
          Stamford, CT[br]\'81 Mako 21[br]Project Thread: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=59462[br]

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          • #6
            Has anyone replaced the fuel lines before? Im curious how to do this because all the lines seem to be filled with foam and idk how Im gonna get all of that out. Im thinking I might have to cut them out of the floor and then reglass over it but Im kinda at a loss. This is the coffin bock with the fuel tank out. Any advise on how to replace furl line and what lines to use would be huge.

            [img]



            [/img]

            This is the removal of the tank.

            [img]





            [/img]
            Stamford, CT[br]\'81 Mako 21[br]Project Thread: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=59462[br]

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            • #7
              nothing about these projects are easy. Sometimes you can get the lines to break free of the foam if you can get them to spin. If you can get them loose, connect the new hose to the old hose with zip ties and try to pull the new hose in when you pull the old hose out.
              Chris Miller[br]Mystic Islands, NJ[br]1974 17 Classic[br]1988 211 Classic (sold)[br]1990 Grady White 230 Gulfstream (sold)[br][img][br]

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              • #8
                quote:


                Originally posted by cgmiller


                nothing about these projects are easy. Sometimes you can get the lines to break free of the foam if you can get them to spin. If you can get them loose, connect the new hose to the old hose with zip ties and try to pull the new hose in when you pull the old hose out.



                I will try the spinning technique. The problem is that my fill and vent lines are aluminum pipes and the one running to the engine is a rubber tube inside a PVC pipe so I dont think pulling them through with the new line attached is an option. Are there any other alternatives to cutting them out of the floor?
                Stamford, CT[br]\'81 Mako 21[br]Project Thread: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=59462[br]

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