Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

To bracket or not to bracket

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • To bracket or not to bracket

    Hey All

    Ive opened another can of worms. Im really interested in adding a bracket to my boat. I figure It'll add space and this will help with the decision of keeping my 224 or going for the 25' Ive also read that it improves fuel and speed due to engine sitting less deep creating less drag and the prop will run on less cavitated water.

    However, Ive got worries about the installation concerning the cables, wires, etc. Will they have to be replaced and if so at what cost. Im also worried about the added strain on the transom when trailering.

    [?][?][8D][8D]

    Pls give me your feedback on intallation, added space, comfort, better ride, fuel consumption, which bracket, etc...

    Is it worth it?

    Thanks...

    Angel B

    (__[A]_______///~~~~ ~~
    87/224[br]Homestead, Florida

  • #2
    quote:


    Ive got worries about the installation concerning the cables, wires, etc. Will they have to be replaced and if so at what cost.



    1st question is, do you have hyd steering on the boat now?

    That is another cost when bracketing a boat.

    Yes cables will have to be replaced.

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Warthog

      Its a Teleflex hydraulic system.
      87/224[br]Homestead, Florida

      Comment


      • #4
        Good, now you will just add 2 bulkhead fitting's and 2 short hyd hoses.

        http://www.seastarsteering.com/OUTBO...fittings.htm&1

        Part # HF5513



        Change out the shift/throttle cables to Teleflex X-tremes with longer length.

        http://www.teleflexmorse.com/Marine/...rine.asp?ID=46

        http://www.teleflexmorse.com/scripts...ontrolMKIV.pdf

        Add a rigging tube.

        http://www.outdoorsuperstore.com/sto...oductID=319730

        and make up longer battery cables.

        Comment


        • #5
          Advice like that is worth its weight in gold...


          Capt Kevin ~~~><((((*>[br][br] 2520 MVSC \"Chesapeake Edition\"[br]Annapolis, Maryland[br]http://ClassicParker.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Sir Warthog.

            I am forever in debt to your kindness and knowledge

            I would have never figured anything like that out on my own..

            What do you think about the whole thing. Is this something that will produce improvements in comfort and ride or should I just stop puzzy-footing and step up to the 25'. I hear it's a great boat.... But, But, But it will cost more $$$$$$ Ive already got 2 motorcycles and an angry wife..

            PS What I do know about is appraisals and if you ever need one in South Florida just let me know....

            [)][)][)][)]

            [][][][][
            87/224[br]Homestead, Florida

            Comment


            • #7
              Makomeone - Keep us posted on decision and results. I am very curious about look and performance of 224 with bracket. I plan to enclose transom, add bracket, and pair of new outboards (4 stoke or maybe E Tec), but I am atleast a year away - unless they money tree in the backyard starts to bloom.
              \'93 241 https://forum.classicmako.com/forum/...etting-started
              \'82 224 - Mobile, AL Gone but NEVER Forgotten - https://forum.classicmako.com/forum/...indshield-tank

              Comment


              • #8
                Makomeone Only you can make the decison on what to do. Sound's like you have plenty of toy's. To enclose a transom,add bracket should not be taken lightly. It's gonn'a take time and money. Jumping to the 25ftr would be fine, but their not fast boat's on a single 225hp motor.

                [mid 30's] You still have a notched transom.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I've found info on the web and previous postings with some intersting information. Im leaning towards installing the engine bracket. It sounds alot cheaper than moving up to the 25' and there are defenite advantages. Right now, my only concern would be the added stress on the transom. My boat is an 87 and although very sound (A Mako, Duh..) Im still jittery about that. It would be great if there was a way of using one of those motor support poles to use when trailering the boat.

                  Also, Im leaning towards leavin the transom notch open. In South Florida, we really dont have a problem with heavy seas and water through the transom hasnt been an issue for me. If it does become one, I can always enclose it later and try to save some money now..
                  87/224[br]Homestead, Florida

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Makomeone, here's another thing that needs to be considered about a transom bracket that I just found out this weekend. Make sure your trailor has some room to move the boat forward some. I picked up my boat this weekend and almost lost it on the highway. With the motor back that much more you will need to move the boat up a few inchs (I had to move about 5" forward) to re-balance the boat on the trailor.
                    Steven[br]1978 Powercat 232[br]One flat broke, the other almost ready to float!!![br]Atlanta, GA

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Yes, You have to get your tongue weight back. This can be down by moving the boat foward and if you can't do that. Move the axles reward to get the tongue weight back.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        _No problem moving my boat up on the trailer a few inches. My "stop" is all the way back and there is plenty of room to move it forward.

                        What would be a good way to determine if the trailer is balanced?

                        Is there a specific tongue weight we would look for.?

                        What about the transom stress thing. Any comments on that..
                        87/224[br]Homestead, Florida

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:


                          Originally posted by Makomeone


                          _No problem moving my boat up on the trailer a few inches. My "stop" is all the way back and there is plenty of room to move it forward.


                          What would be a good way to determine if the trailer is balanced?

                          Is there a specific tongue weight we would look for.?

                          What about the transom stress thing. Any comments on that..


                          I think the magic ratio is 60/40 or about 500lbs at the tongue. A floor jack with a scale on it that would work great. The "redneck way" is to run a bar with blocks on each end under the tongue. Place a bathroom scale on one end of the board. When you lower the tongue on the bar, the scale will read half of what the tongue weight is.

                          It's true that the bracket will add more stress on the transom but if it's good and strong it should be not problem. Otherwise a new transom with some support knees would be in order.
                          Steven[br]1978 Powercat 232[br]One flat broke, the other almost ready to float!!![br]Atlanta, GA

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:


                            What about the transom stress thing. Any comments on that..



                            Most of the stress on the transom comes when trailering. Don't trailer with the motors all the way up on the "lock" arms. Put the motors down just as the slow trim engages. Having the balance right on the trailer, as Hung said, will be a big help.
                            Artie Sutherland[br]Rude Attitude -\'76 Mako 25 CC. - SOLD[br]1976 Mako 21[br]2002 Yellowfin 31 - 300 hp Suzukis[br]Gulf Coast, Mississippi[br]

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              MAKOMEONE,

                              Have just completed the very conversion of a 224 that you're considering, on my own 1983 224, which had been originaly equipped with a Johnson 235 GT.

                              I enclosed the transom (replacing ALL of the transom the WET wood with Coosa Board), added a 30" Armstrong bracket, installed twin Suzuki DF-140 4-strokes, lengthened the trailer to allow supports for the engines/bracket during trailering (I trailer with the motors on the locks in the UP position, to reduce the possibilities of them either dragging on the ground, or being "inadvertently bumped into by parking lot idiots...), moved the axles approx 12 inches rearward to re-balance, increased the size of the trim tabs, etc. etc. etc...

                              I am VERY pleased with the results, as I have improved (smoother) ride, fuel economy is nearly three times better, WAY quieter, NO more stench of partially burned fuel, WAY more power, had more useable interior room, and it trailers VERY nice...

                              HOWEVER, as with ALL good things, there are some down sides... You should be aware that this conversion is NOT an inexpensive one... $22K for motors & rigging, $3.5K for bracket & accessories, $1.5K in transom materials, and approx $500 in trailer modification materials, $300 for larger trim tabs, for a grand total of approx. $28,000 PLUS several hundred hours of my own labor, involved in getting it accomplished.

                              There is more info on this project under my older post "transom materials". I would be happy to discuss any part of this project with you, if you have questions...

                              Good Luck, OB1
                              Working for a livin\' is HIGHLY Over-Rated...[][br]

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X