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  • Advice needed, quick

    I have a 1985 224, and I either need to replace the wobble rollers (32 of them devils) at about $9.00 each or change the trailer to a set of bunks. I have always gotten good advice before so I am asking which way I should go. For you guys who have had both types of trailers (bunks vs. rollers) or experience with both types of trailers. Should I replace the rollers or go to a bunk type of set-up?? Which do you guys think will be cheaper, quicker, etc. Also if you know where I can get cheaper rollers let me know. The rollers are 3 1/2" Dia. 3 1/4" long, with a 1" shaft size. Since I would be replacing all the rollers, if they were a different dia. it would be ok, just something close. I guess the length and shaft size are the most important numbers. Hell, I would even use used rollers if they were in good shape. I await your advice[)][)][)]
    Don Flowers[br]Port Lavaca, Tx.[br]Mako 224 1985 \"Godspeed\"[br]Yamaha 175

  • #2
    Here is a site link I buy my trailer parts from. I am not sure if its the cheapest place but its a start. www.championtrailers.com

    I ilke bunk trailers. I like them because I live in Connecticut. It is not unusual for our roads to have huge potholes. If you hit one of those with the roller type trailer there is a real good chance of fracturing the fiberglass where the boat meets the trailer.

    Good luck

    PG
    1979 21 CC Mako, 2006 E Tec 225 Hp [br]Connecticut

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    • #3
      Hi Don, I have both roller and bunk trailers. I like bunks better for a few reasons. Bunks bite the boat better and are easier to load by yourself. Bunks are cheaper to mantain too. Rollers can be a problem if your trailer gets loose, which has happened to me.

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      • #4
        I've owned both types of trailers and preferred the bunk type.

        Roller trailers are preferred by some people that are forced to use steep or unimproved ramps, but I never cared for them because of the maintence of all those rollers. The caps that keep the rollers attached to the pins are made of steel, which rust, and seem to fall off at the most in-opportune time (usually while launching). Then you have to try and re-load the boat while trying to keep the exposed pin(s) from digging into the bottom of the boat.

        My trailer had the older black rollers which left black marks on the hull that were a pain to clean off. I much preferred power-loading the boat with the bunks to winching the boat onto the rollers. Cleaner and simpler.

        My bunk trailer was simple to maintain. Every now and then after launching the boat, I'd take a bottle of cheap dish detergent and pour it on the wet bunk carpet to keep it clean and slippery.

        My preference after using both would be for bunks.
        Capt Kevin ~~~><((((*>[br][br] 2520 MVSC \"Chesapeake Edition\"[br]Annapolis, Maryland[br]http://ClassicParker.com/

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        • #5
          I'd go with the bunks. Easier to load, cleaner on the hull, and much easier to maintain. The support while trailering is much better also. $02 worth, not tax charged []
          Artie Sutherland[br]Rude Attitude -\'76 Mako 25 CC. - SOLD[br]1976 Mako 21[br]2002 Yellowfin 31 - 300 hp Suzukis[br]Gulf Coast, Mississippi[br]

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          • #6
            Thanks for the quick advice. I think I will change to bunks. It's going to cost me a couple hundred bucks no matter what I do, so it may as well be changed now. Don
            Don Flowers[br]Port Lavaca, Tx.[br]Mako 224 1985 \"Godspeed\"[br]Yamaha 175

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            • #7
              DON, I BOUGHT ALL THE PARTS TO CONVERT FROM WOBBLE TO BUNKS AND WHEN I STARTED CHANGING THINGS OUT THE BOX TUBING FRAME GOT SOME RATHER LARGE HOLES IN STRATIGIC PLACES. REDWING BOAT CO IN HOUSTON HAD SPORTSMAN TRAILERS MEASURE THE BOAT (86 228) SAME HULL AS 224 AND THEY WERE ABLE TO PUT IT ON A 20 FT FRAME WITH A LONGER TOUNGE. NOW I HAVE A GREAT DRIVE ON TRAILER. GOING FROM A 22DC FRAME TO A 22DC FRAME SAVED OVER $600 ON THE TRAILER.
              OVER BUDGET[br]PEARLAND TX

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              • #8
                It seems to me that it's 10 times easier to load on a bunk trailer especially on steep ramps and also it's much easier to lose your boat on the ramp with rollers. They're also much easier to maintain.
                Pete[br]MaColAh III [br]93\' 261b[br]HO 200 hp ETEC\'s[br]Cape Cod[br]

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                • #9
                  Hey Don-

                  Here is my 2 cents from a guy who has owned a bunk and a roller trailer..

                  Bunk trailers offer more support and since they have less moving parts, are cheaper and easier to maintain. However, they are a pain in the ass to winch a boat on especially when the ramp is steep. Plus, all of the winching against the bunks will wear down the gelcoat.

                  Roller trailers are much easier to load (especially on steep ramps) and if you get one with a lot of rollers (at least 40) you will have plenty of support. Also, around here in Massachusetts many ramp owners no longer are allowing you to power load because the prop wash digs holes at the bottom of the ramp.

                  Of course, you need to do what is right for you. Unless you have Hulk Hogan arms...I'd go with the roller.

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                  • #10
                    I personally would go with a bunk trailer, even here up north with an average tide swing of 9'6".

                    My only problem is with my aluminum Rolls tandem trailer, it floats without the boat on it (yes, it floats). I'm planning to fill the aluminum guide-on tubes with cement to add weight and it will also stiffen them. I'm dealing with about 20lbs of positive bouyancy, but in a breeze, it can be a pain. Good thing the trailer is only used twice a year, spring to launch and fall to pull.

                    D-
                    Current Mqko - 1990 Mako 211 w/2006 250 E-TEC. http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6226. [br]- Previous Makos 1987 20C, 1979 23\' IB, 1970s 17 Angler

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                    • #11
                      Like DT MACKEY said....if you are using the trailer twice a year, go with the bunk. However, if you are using the trailer each time you go out....go with the roller. I winch on/off in river that has a 9' tide plus a 6-8knot current (when the tide is going out)and I have no problems. Boat comes on up nice & straight every time.

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                      • #12
                        I have decided to stay with the rollers strictly from an economic standpoint. I can replace the rollers (all 32) for about $250.00 dollars vs. $450.00 to change to bunks, and I do launch from some pretty steep ramps. And for a pretty heavy 224, it does winch up pretty easy. Thanks for all the food for thought. The rollers should be here this Friday. Don
                        Don Flowers[br]Port Lavaca, Tx.[br]Mako 224 1985 \"Godspeed\"[br]Yamaha 175

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                        • #13
                          DYMackey - Was think about your comment about filling the tubes with cement. While it sounds like a good idea I would thing that if the cement was forced sideways (placing the cement in tension which is NG for cement) it's going to crack across the diameter inside the tube and with that extra weight, it may kink or crack the AL tube. I would first try filling the tubes with sand. That way the tubes would remain flexable but still heaver and more stable. And if you need more weight just wet the sand before you use it. Make sure that you drill a water escape hole so it can drain out after use. Sand would also be a lot cheeper - Just another thought -

                          Mike
                          1973 22 CC Milford, CT USA[br]

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                          • #14
                            Mike,

                            The sand thing does sound good, but the added time of filling it with sand adds time and if it does not wash out of the tube then it would accelerate the corresion problem inside the guide-on. While cement is not the fix-all/cure-all it does prevent water from entering the tube, especially when a bead of 5200 is applied to the circumerference of the end sitting the the water. The amount of stress the guide ons take is minimal so the shear issue are not a concern.

                            Good points and thanks for the feedback.

                            D-
                            Current Mqko - 1990 Mako 211 w/2006 250 E-TEC. http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6226. [br]- Previous Makos 1987 20C, 1979 23\' IB, 1970s 17 Angler

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                            • #15
                              You may want to think about buying ingots of lead and bolting it to your trailer frame. It will not corrode or cause any corrosion to your trailer components. The last yacht that we built had these ingots bolted in place for permanent ballast.

                              Another idea would be to fill your tubes with either molten lead or lead shot. Lead shot can be bought pretty reasonable at a gun shop that sells reloading supplies. Since the specific gravity of lead is much higher than both concrete and sand you will not have to add as much.
                              Richie L.[br]Biloxi, Mississippi

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