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  • Water in Hull

    Hey Guys,

    I have a 1988 201 Mako and while drilling holes in the transom for trim tabs I had some water weep out of the holes. The wood looked pretty saturated but the core was pretty strong. I keep the boat trailered in my yard and not real sure how all the water got in. IS this a major problem, taking to a boat yard nextdoor to get their opinion. Any ideas? Thanks.
    1988 20C, DF150 Suzuki

  • #2
    Well the marine surveyor checked out the hull yesterday, banged around, poked around and said the hull was fine. I am pretty sure the hull is a lot heavier than the original 1775 lbs. The 20C will be heading abck out.
    1988 20C, DF150 Suzuki

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    • #3
      What kind of inspections do they do? I thought about getting one to inspect mine but I figured what can they do that I cannot?
      Troy[br]Pensacola, FL[br]1977 21\' Mako Deep V[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20954

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      • #4
        The deal with the surveyor was his 20+ years of experience with fiberglass hulls. He just basically inspected gelcoat cracks and banged around all over the place; transom, hull, down in the bilge. Said it was in good solid shape, he had replaced a few transoms before.

        Just a piece of mind as I slam through waves 10 miles off.
        1988 20C, DF150 Suzuki

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        • #5
          Most good surveyors have tools to test how much moisture there is in the hull.
          Sarasota, Florida

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          • #6
            Most people will not tell you this, but 90+% of the transoms out there on boats that are moored in the water for most of the year have wet transoms. This is because of several reasons - motor bolts were not properly cauked, transducer screws were not properly cauked, water seepted in from the inside the boat, cauking started to leak and no one noticed for several years (or not at all) etc., etc,. It takes years for a wet transom to completely rot out and then it needs to be repaired. If the boat is out of the water for a long enough time and the water is allowed a path to drain out, most of it will. Then the leaks will need to be fixed / cauked and you start all over again. Boating by nature, is a self distructive endavor and man cannot stop the salt, sea and mother nature from doing what she does naturally - grinding everything down to just the elements over time.

            Mike
            1973 22 CC Milford, CT USA[br]

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