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Hard Steering Problem Mako 236 IB

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  • Hard Steering Problem Mako 236 IB

    Just picked up a 1990 236 IB. Everything is great except the steering is very stiff when I get up to 3K rpm and over. Steering cable was replaced prior to purchasing the boat which was supposed to fix this problem. At lower speeds the steering is smooth and effortless. Above 3K rpm the boat wants to go straight and it takes a lot of effort to redirect her (more effort to turn to starboard than port). And once you overcome whatever it is keeping her going straight she turns hard enough to dump passengers who are not holding onto something. I can understand that it should take more effort to turn the rudder at higher speed but this seems to be too much. There were zincs on the rudder that have been removed, would this do it?

    Anyone had this symptom before on an IB
    Ken Johnson

  • #2
    You might need to have your rudder and rudder shaft checked for straitness. if it is bent you will get squirly steering like that.

    can you pull the boat out and do a visual check on the rudder.? then grab it and see if you can chuck it back and forth or up and down. thats the place I would start. dave
    [br]1994 Mako 215 Dual console Optimax 225[br]1978 Mako 19 with 90hp johnson[br]1996 Mako 22[br]1982 Mako 171 Angler 135 Black Max Mercury[br]1987 21b 225 Yamaha[br]1974 23 inboard Gusto gone.[br]1979m21 225johnson \"blue dolphin\" bought off this board and restored [br]with everyone\'s help!!Gone but not Forgotten....[br]1979 20 Mako 115 Suzuki gone[br]1977 19 Mako 115 Johnson gone[br]1976 23 Mako twin 140 Johnsons gone[br]1983 224 with closed transom and bracket[br]And 162 SOB (some other boats)[br]Venice Florida, Traverse city Mi.

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    • #3
      Had the same boat and I had the same issue. My steering was cable, noy hydraulic, and as the engine RPMs increased the steering got harder. This is a function of the prop fighting the rudder. It's hard to believe that the force can be so great since the 23' already has too small a rudder.

      David M
      Current Mqko - 1990 Mako 211 w/2006 250 E-TEC. http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6226. [br]- Previous Makos 1987 20C, 1979 23\' IB, 1970s 17 Angler

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      • #4
        Is this a straight up inboard or a inboard/outboard?

        On an I/O there's a compensation tab. However, on inboards with rudders, I've seen where a tab was cut in the trailing edge of the rudder and the steel (or aluminum) was bent in the proper direction to aleviate the strain.

        On another question... is it harder to one side than the other?

        -Pat
        18ft MonArk tri-hull: 140HP Mercruiser Alpha One - still in pieces...to be continued[br](I know it\'s not a Mako, but hey, its mine!)[br] Time\'s fun when you\'re having flies![br]president/hostmaster:[br]P.Ring Technologies[br]Cornerstone IT, LLC[br]LOUISIANA WEB HOST, LLC.[br]CompTIA Certified Professional A+/Network+ // Microsoft Registered Partner

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        • #5
          quote:


          Originally posted by kdjohn


          I can understand that it should take more effort to turn the rudder at higher speed but this seems to be too much. There were zincs on the rudder that have been removed, would this do it?



          Very likely..
          18ft MonArk tri-hull: 140HP Mercruiser Alpha One - still in pieces...to be continued[br](I know it\'s not a Mako, but hey, its mine!)[br] Time\'s fun when you\'re having flies![br]president/hostmaster:[br]P.Ring Technologies[br]Cornerstone IT, LLC[br]LOUISIANA WEB HOST, LLC.[br]CompTIA Certified Professional A+/Network+ // Microsoft Registered Partner

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          • #6
            Ken,

            I have a 1988, same boat, same issue. Wait untill you try to manuever in reverse. You will forget all about this issue.
            Paul[br]Plantation, Fl [br]1988 Mako 236 Inboard

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            • #7
              quote:


              Originally posted by Cyclops


              Is this a straight up inboard or a inboard/outboard?


              On an I/O there's a compensation tab. However, on inboards with rudders, I've seen where a tab was cut in the trailing edge of the rudder and the steel (or aluminum) was bent in the proper direction to aleviate the strain.

              On another question... is it harder to one side than the other?

              -Pat


              It seems to be more difficult to turn to starboard than port. Is this due to the asymetric wash from the prop? It is really not the extra effort that bothers me it is the fact that it takes a lot of effort to get her off a straight heading and then the effort reduces which makes me over steer, that is when the people in the back of the boat go overboard. I will pull the boat and inspect the rudder.
              Ken Johnson

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              • #8
                Goes straight, mine never goes straight, unless I hold it there. If you let go of the wheel its a hard left turn coming. When me and my wife are both hooked up with fish the boat is on auto pilot going in a circle.

                When I am running 20+ knots is a bit hard to steer at first then is very smooth. I always figured its the pressure of the prop on the rudder.

                Turn in reverse, I have gotten good at this. There is no turning, its back and fowards, back and fowards. Doing this with jet skies and other idiots is always fun. I had to squeeze into a fuel dock in Bimini this week between a very nice new hydrosport and a sail cat, got it in but its always work. Only people who a have driven a single screw straight inboard can understand how good you have to be to park the thing, its like parallel parking a 18 wheeler. Wind, current, other boats, tons of fun.

                Paul, went to Bimini this week, had tons of fun. You going this summer? we are going across one more time in August sometime.
                Andy

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                • #9
                  I have this same issue even with the boat out of the water. Tougher to turn to port side than starboard. I am guessing my issue is the cable though.
                  Troy[br]Pensacola, FL[br]1977 21\' Mako Deep V[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20954

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                  • #10
                    I had a 20 ft shamrock with the same problem, the rudder shaft had a very slight bend that combined with the rotation of the prop made steering very hard.Started after hitting a sandbar in the fog, had the shaft straightened and problem went away.

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                    • #11
                      My problem went away as well after the first couple of times in the water. I think the cables just needed to be worked in good.
                      Troy[br]Pensacola, FL[br]1977 21\' Mako Deep V[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=20954

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                      • #12
                        Keep it greased up and I always store the boat with the rudder turned so the cable is all the way closed, as not to have an thing get on my cable.

                        andy
                        Andy

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