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Dear those who INSIST on powerloading...

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  • quote:


    Originally posted by mako224


    I am usually by myself or with one other person. I use a roller trailer with both my 224 and our 17 Key West in Florida. Technique is the same. Back the trailer down just short of the hubs going under. I powerload to within a foot of the winch stand then leave the boat in gear with just enough throttle so it doesn't roll back. Then I run up front, lean over the bow and attach the winch cable. Crank it tight. Then I go shut the motor off. Jump over the side attach the chain shackle to the boat and winch it up the last foot. I'm gone and out of the way in minutes before most have even figured out how to back down the ramp in a strait line.



    That is exactly how I do my 250. Even if I am not solo I still do it that way but have my buddy to winch it up.
    Proud member of the [br]I.B.E.W. local827[br]Keith,[br]franklin, new jersey[br]1989 mako 250WA[br]2007 twin 150 etecs[br]

    Comment


    • quote:


      Originally posted by mako224


      I am usually by myself or with one other person. I use a roller trailer with both my 224 and our 17 Key West in Florida. Technique is the same. Back the trailer down just short of the hubs going under. I powerload to within a foot of the winch stand then leave the boat in gear with just enough throttle so it doesn't roll back. Then I run up front, lean over the bow and attach the winch cable. Crank it tight. Then I go shut the motor off. Jump over the side attach the chain shackle to the boat and winch it up the last foot. I'm gone and out of the way in minutes before most have even figured out how to back down the ramp in a strait line.



      That is exactly how I do my 250. Even if I am not solo I still do it that way but have my buddy to winch it up.
      Proud member of the [br]I.B.E.W. local827[br]Keith,[br]franklin, new jersey[br]1989 mako 250WA[br]2007 twin 150 etecs[br]

      Comment


      • quote:


        Originally posted by mako224


        I am usually by myself or with one other person. I use a roller trailer with both my 224 and our 17 Key West in Florida. Technique is the same. Back the trailer down just short of the hubs going under. I powerload to within a foot of the winch stand then leave the boat in gear with just enough throttle so it doesn't roll back. Then I run up front, lean over the bow and attach the winch cable. Crank it tight. Then I go shut the motor off. Jump over the side attach the chain shackle to the boat and winch it up the last foot. I'm gone and out of the way in minutes before most have even figured out how to back down the ramp in a strait line.



        That is exactly how I do my 250. Even if I am not solo I still do it that way but have my buddy to winch it up.
        Proud member of the [br]I.B.E.W. local827[br]Keith,[br]franklin, new jersey[br]1989 mako 250WA[br]2007 twin 150 etecs[br]

        Comment


        • My brother and I did a Seagrass Survey at the North Causeway ramps in New Smyrna...required because they were permitting for a couple new finger piers. While diving the ramp area and searching for seagrass, I discovered that powerloading had created a nice sized cavern at the base of the ramp at about 12 feet deep...there were two lobsters living in it! The only benefit of powerloading I've ever seen.
          [/URL]

          Comment


          • My brother and I did a Seagrass Survey at the North Causeway ramps in New Smyrna...required because they were permitting for a couple new finger piers. While diving the ramp area and searching for seagrass, I discovered that powerloading had created a nice sized cavern at the base of the ramp at about 12 feet deep...there were two lobsters living in it! The only benefit of powerloading I've ever seen.
            [/URL]

            Comment


            • I don't think I could get my trailer deep enough to get the 261 on it without power loading. And to top it I have to get someone to hook me and crank while I'm at 2500+ RPMs just to get the bow onto the bow roller. If the bow does not roll up the roller about 3 inches then when the trailer/boat is pulled out of the water the boat will be about an inch behind the roller.

              Generally I stay on throttles at about 2500 RPMs until the props break free while the truck is pulling the boat out of the water. Keeps the truck from spinning out and slinging loose gravel or crap at the hull.

              I'd be amazed if there were any side effects at our ramps here in south LA. We are so silty here it's ridiculous. Most ramps here are crushed oyster shells anyhow. They just keep adding them yearly. And if it a concrete ramp, it most likely was oyster shells at one time so there's a good solid foundation beneath and behind.
              Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

              Comment


              • I don't think I could get my trailer deep enough to get the 261 on it without power loading. And to top it I have to get someone to hook me and crank while I'm at 2500+ RPMs just to get the bow onto the bow roller. If the bow does not roll up the roller about 3 inches then when the trailer/boat is pulled out of the water the boat will be about an inch behind the roller.

                Generally I stay on throttles at about 2500 RPMs until the props break free while the truck is pulling the boat out of the water. Keeps the truck from spinning out and slinging loose gravel or crap at the hull.

                I'd be amazed if there were any side effects at our ramps here in south LA. We are so silty here it's ridiculous. Most ramps here are crushed oyster shells anyhow. They just keep adding them yearly. And if it a concrete ramp, it most likely was oyster shells at one time so there's a good solid foundation beneath and behind.
                Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

                Comment

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