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  • cutting question

    i have burned up 2 dewalt 7 1/4 in plywood/laminate sawblades and numerous jigswaw blades cutting fiberglass. i was wondering if there are any blades in particular anyone has had 'fairly' good service out of. am strongly considering using abrasive coated blades but want to see if anyone has any feedback.
    Grant[br]87 21b 97 Suzuki DT200[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23633[br]New Orleans, LA[br][email protected]

  • #2
    chainsaw...[]
    22 Tiara pursuit[br]Greenwich,Ct

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    • #3
      Is It nessassary that you use the circular saw?

      Home Depot has a blade made by Remimtion [the gun people] It's a Carbon Friction blade ment for a sawsall and they make them for jigsaw's too.

      With that said they will not fit my Boush jigsaw. It takes the "T" type blades. I use bimetal blades it it. They last a pretty good while.

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      • #4
        quote:


        Originally posted by warthog5


        Is It nessassary that you use the circular saw?


        Home Depot has a blade made by Remimtion [the gun people] It's a Carbon Friction blade ment for a sawsall and they make them for jigsaw's too.

        With that said they will not fit my Boush jigsaw. It takes the "T" type blades. I use bimetal blades it it. They last a pretty good while.


        i actually saw the blade you were talking about today at the home depot. it was actually a type t. almost bought it but decided to try the bimetals.

        i find that the circular saw makes it easier to start a straight cut and making nice edges on the panels. it also eliminates the need for drilling a hole to start the jigsaw. i actually burned up the second blade scarfing 2 pieces of 1/2 plywood that had been laminated together. i opted for a 40 tooth carbide tip to try the fiberglass cutting. we'll see how that one goes.
        Grant[br]87 21b 97 Suzuki DT200[br]http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23633[br]New Orleans, LA[br][email protected]

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        • #5
          Carbide tipped blade will work on the circular saw, just plan on throwing it away when you are finished, it won't stay sharp and it is probably more expensive to have sharpened.

          Bi-metal blades on the jigsaw and sawzall work great, and last a long time, as long as you don't bend them all to hell. High speed steel wouldn't even get me through the coosa board.
          1975 23\' Tampa,FL

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          • #6
            I had the same problem until I bought a hard circular blade for the rotary tool. I don't remember which model it is, but it's a Dremel attachment available at HomeDepot. Looks like a small circular saw with the texture of a grinder. I have not been able to break it, and it cuts through anithing with ease.
            Past:[br]1988 Mako 230[br]1987 Mako 20C (best of them all)[br][br]1974 Mako 15[br]Miami, FL[br]

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            • #7
              I use a 2 or 3 inches circular disk mounted on a air rotary tool. Workd very good on thick areas. I cut the mark (the area I want to cut) and start to make it deeper till I complete the cut.
              JAPD

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              • #8
                I like a 4 1/2" grinder with a 1/8" thick abrasive blade. I also like a jigsaw with "Hollow-ground" blades. These last a long time and cut very well.

                Now for the ultimate saw, look at this new saw from Sears. It is a dual circular saw that has 2 blade that cut against each other!

                http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/produ...vertical=SEARS
                Richie L.[br]Biloxi, Mississippi

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                • #9
                  When i put a new deck on my sailboat, and worked in boat yards I used a 4 1/2" grinder with a masonite (sp) wheel. It was recomended to me by a professional fiberglass worker, and works very well. you burn them up occasionally but they last preaty long and are fairly in-expepensive.
                  \'76 Dyer 29- PALMETTO[br]\'?? 17 Angler [br]Darien, CT

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