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  • water in fuel tank

    Help. I added water to my 285 300 gallon fuel tank trying to keep my trailered boat from blowing away in the hurricanes. Now I can't get it all out. Prior to adding the water I called a marine fuel tank cleaning service and he said he could suck it all out. I geuss he didn't count on the baffles etc. Any ideas on what to do now? Ijust got the restoration complete and the new engines are on. I really don't want to remove the tank. Thanks

  • #2
    Pull the fuel sending unit, tilt the trailer and have him suck it out.

    The baffel's slow sloshing gas down. They don't prevent it from flowing.

    But the big question is why did you think you should add water to the fuel tank?[]

    Plug the hull drain and add it to the bildge. OK

    But not the fuel tank.

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    • #3
      Once you get "the lion's share" of the water out (no more than approx 1 qt of water remaining), add approx. 1 pint (16 oz._ of denatured alcohol, for every 5 gal of fuel, to absorb the rest of the water.

      What I'd do is add about 10-20 gal of fuel, and a couple qts of denatured alcohol, tow the boat a few miles to get it to slosh around and give the alcohol time to absord the water, then pump that out as well.

      Finally add fuel and aprox 1 cup of denatured alcohol to absorb any remenants, & go boating.

      Good luck...
      Working for a livin\' is HIGHLY Over-Rated...[][br]

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      • #4
        And change those racors out after 1 hour!
        Jeff Reid[br]Sanford NC

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        • #5
          quote:


          Originally posted by warthog5


          Pull the fuel sending unit, tilt the trailer and have him suck it out.

          The baffel's slow sloshing gas down. They don't prevent it from flowing.


          But the big question is why did you think you should add water to the fuel tank?[]

          Plug the hull drain and add it to the bildge. OK

          But not the fuel tank.


          Comment


          • #6
            quote:


            Originally posted by warthog5


            Pull the fuel sending unit, tilt the trailer and have him suck it out.

            The baffel's slow sloshing gas down. They don't prevent it from flowing.


            But the big question is why did you think you should add water to the fuel tank?[]

            Plug the hull drain and add it to the bildge. OK

            But not the fuel tank.


            id="left">The bilge is not that big and I really didn't want to saturate all the foam. The guy said he could get it all dry. I cant seem to get past the baffle to get to all the water thru the fuel sender. I will try to go thru sender and get to the front of the tank and lower the front of the boat as much as possible. Wigley

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            • #7
              This post has got to be a joke.

              jbsmako '73 23'Mako

              obx,nc

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              • #8
                I'm assuming you're a southeastern guy since there's talk of multiple hurricanes. No disrespect, but why wouldn't you just fill the tanks with gas to add weight. If it was a $$ issue, that money used to have someone pump your tanks out could have been put towards the fuel???
                [br]Michael R. Delgado[br]1972 Mako 22[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=15745[br]1976 Mako 25[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=18013&SearchTerms=mako,25[br]

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                • #9
                  plus fuel was a bit cheaper back then so you could have started out the season ahead of the curve
                  Steve Glasgow[br]Lake Worth Fl.[br]74 22B

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                  • #10
                    I would not add water in the bilge. That is a LOT of weight and you can very easily end up with the trailer bunks pushing through the hull especially if you have a trailer with rollers. The best thing to do is to strap the boat down to the ground with sunken anchors down in the ground. You could even use an anchor out each side if you had enough room. During Ivan I put 6x6 blocks under the frame about half way from the trailer to the tongue and then ran a strap across the down to anchors in the yard. I also had the truck on the southern side to protect it and didn't have a problem. Didn't answer your question, but if someone else reads this, I hope they try this before adding water the fuel tank or in the bilge.
                    1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog
                    1985 Mako 20c - sold
                    Fort Walton Beach, FL
                    https://forum.classicmako.com/forum/...og-bottom-time

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