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1984 254 cc fuel tanks

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  • 1984 254 cc fuel tanks

    Help:I have a 254 cc with a 100gal main tank an a 51 gal 2nd tank. It had a transfer pump between the 2 tanks . i was needing to know if the pump was standard or if someone add it.The pump is not working i need to replace it but cann't find this pump listed anywhere.Can anyone help me? Thanks 4 any help!!!!

  • #2
    Well i went to napa an got a eletric fuel pump that will pump 45gals a hr. i'm going to put a inline filter in it. do think this will work? any ideals?

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    • #3
      My 1985 254 has a 150gal main tank and 50gal front tank. The previous owner pulled out the pump and ran the two tanks independently. I have a manual valve that allows me to switch either engine to the front tank or run them both off the rear. Running them both off the front tank causing problems though. The little 50gal tank wasn't setup for two 200hp engines drawing at the same time, so the engines get starved.
      Pompano Beach, FL[br]1985 254 w/ twin 200 yamis 1995[br]

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      • #4
        saulty Be very careful with running both on the front tank and causing a lean condition. That's a good way to burn a piston.

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        • #5
          saulty. So you have a 254 an it came with a transfer pump from the factory or did someone put it on .See i talk with a mech at a dealer.he said that all the early mako's he has seen came with a valve inbetween the 2 tanks. So thats what had me woundering .then i could not get a listing on any transfer pumps. then i found a listing for the pump that was in it an it was listed for deisl fuel only an the man that found the listing said thats why it went out because deisl is oil base gas is not so it burnt the pump up. so i found a fuel pump that a lot of airboater's use on there boats.so i though it would work on my boat. so do you think i'm going wright way? THANK YOU: FOR THE INPUT!!!!!!!!

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          • #6
            I'm not sure if it originally came with a pump. I just bought the boat 1.5 years ago. The previous owner did say he removed the pump and ran them separately. I recently looked into hooking the two back together, but the dealer said I would definitely need a pump since gravity alone wouldn't move the gas to the lower tank. Then he quoted a several hundred dollar price for a pump and I decided that I like the setup I have. The only time I fill both tanks is when I'm heading to the bahamas. I draw one engine from one and the other from the other tank. Once the front 50 gal is empty, I switch both engines to the large 150 tank which has another 100 left.
            Pompano Beach, FL[br]1985 254 w/ twin 200 yamis 1995[br]

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            • #7
              I have a 1978 model 25, so this may not apply to the 254, but I think it should since both models have their tanks in the same place and relative elevation.

              My set up, which is original, does not have a transfer pump. It uses a tee at the top of the front tank that feeds two lines (both 5/8") to a pair of three way valves. These valves are on either side of a tee at the top of the rear tank pick up tube. The fuel line to the engine (again both are 5/8")comes out of the remaining port in the valve. Ok, so far?

              So what you have is the front tank "in" to port #1, rear tank "in" to port #2, fuel to engine "out" through port #3. Using the valves, you can feed whichever tank you want to the engine.

              I have not experienced any starving. As long as your pick up tube is clean, your valves are open, and the fuel lines sized properly, you should not have any starving. (Saulty - is the fuel flow to both engines being restricted to one fuel line somewhere when you experience the starving.)

              I don't think I'd want the transfer pump down there as long as I could maintain trim and manage the fuel. It requires fuel line splices that can't be monitored easily. We run off our rear tank until empty and then switch over to the front. The trim stays nice using this approach. Conversley, when our front tank is empty and the rear tank full, our trim sucks.
              Ole Joe
              Just floundering around
              White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
              1978 Mako 25

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              • #8
                Yes, I only have a single line coming from the front tank that goes all the way to the transom then hits a t where both engines are fed. There are also a couple 90 degree turns in the line that probably don't help either. So both engines try to pull from the single line. I forget the size of the line, but I have problems when I really get on both engines.

                It could be a combination of line size, vacuum in the tank, or the intake being partially clogged. The front tank sat a while in its previous life so there may be some gunk at the bottom. I can live with running one engine off it at a time.
                Pompano Beach, FL[br]1985 254 w/ twin 200 yamis 1995[br]

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                • #9
                  Saulty,

                  Do you have two lines going from the rear tank to the engines?
                  Ole Joe
                  Just floundering around
                  White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                  1978 Mako 25

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                  • #10
                    Yes. The rear 150gal has two dedicated lines. One to each engine.
                    Pompano Beach, FL[br]1985 254 w/ twin 200 yamis 1995[br]

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                    • #11
                      Saulty,

                      Is the pick up tube for the front tank accessible to you through an inspection port in the fuel tank access panel? The tube should be at the rear of the tank. If it is, you could easily re-rig as described above with two short lengths of fuel line, two 3-way valves, and a tee. Use only good reinforced 5/8" marine fuel line.

                      Try running with your 50 gal tank full always. That will be your reserve. If you know your fuel consumption values, you will automaticly know your reserve range. If your trim works out the way my has, I think you'll like the ride better with the front tank full.

                      If you need a sketch email me your address and I'll draw up one for you.

                      Super Duty 2,

                      I hope this is a help to you also. If you can pull directly from the front tank to the engines, I think that your better off. Just my opinion.
                      Ole Joe
                      Just floundering around
                      White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                      1978 Mako 25

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                      • #12
                        My 254 (83) came with the optional 150gal.main and the 50gal. forward tank.There is on the port side across from the forward console seat,a fiberglass rectangular box that houses the electric fuel pump to move fuel form front to rear.It is a Stewart/Warner 50gal.pump with a micron internal filter.Has worked for 21 years!

                        Boat is compleately restored.Twin yamaha 150 etc............ Great for fishing,diving or just lookin good as compared to sooooo many newer boats.

                        GB[]

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                        • #13
                          Hi Flounder,

                          So, your tee is actually screwed right into the front tank? This may do the trick then. Mine has a single line running the length of the boat then hitting the tee. Then each line from the tee goes to a 3 way switch just like yours. I pretty much have the exact same setup as you, but your tee is right at the tank rather than down by the engines. It would be really easy to switch my setup. Just two new runs of line and a new tee fittings for the tank.

                          Have you noticed if having the front tank full changes the way your boat sits in the water? I hate that my scuppers are just above sealevel when loaded with fuel and people. One wave over the transom and they are pretty much at sea level. Unless everyone goes to the bow of the boat, water stays flooded back there. I'm thinking about making a couple new scuppers 2 inches above the existing ones. Then just plugging the originals when I'm drift fishing.

                          basscor, how does your 25 sit in the water fully loaded with fuel and people? The 150s should be a bit lighter. Or have you filled in the transom and added a bracket?
                          Pompano Beach, FL[br]1985 254 w/ twin 200 yamis 1995[br]

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                          • #14
                            Yes, both tanks have tees at the top of the pick up tubes. They are set up so the there is a fuel line coming out of the port side of the tee and the other line coming out of the starboard side of the tee. The three ways are attached to the rear tube on port and starboard sides. The front tank tee feeds into two short fuel lines that run back to the three ways on top of the rear tube. Then, from this point, port and starboard fuel lines (two lines) run to the engines.

                            The three way valve postion determines which tank we pick up ("in" ports) from. The third port is the "out" port to the engine.

                            On my 78 model, the rear pick up tube happens to be under the console. The three ways are "hard" mounted to the rear tee with couplings. I simply reach in through the rear access hatch and change the postion of the three way selector when changing tanks.

                            Regarding fuel vs. trim, it makes a big diffreence in my boat. My tanks are 80 gal rear and 40 gal front, so this will not fit your situation excatly. When loaded with fuel and ice, she sits too low. About 1" to 1 1/2" freeboard below the scuppers. When I have 1/2 tank in rear (front tank is always full) there is probably 2" to 3" freeboard. With the rear tank empty I'd say we have a constant 3" freeboard. But the best part is that the trim is fine with the front tank full, regardless of the amount of fuel in the rear. She never gets bow down. I suspect that the front tank is at a center point and the weight does not have an effect on trim attitude.

                            When I first got the boat I ran off the front tank first as standard operating proceedure. The scuppers were always under water. For off-shore runs I would reverse my proceedure and run the rear tank first. My idea was that using the 40 gal front tank as my reserve, I'd get home as long as I stayed inside of forty miles. Well, many days we came home with the rear tank running empty on the way in. It was on those occasions that I realized that she rode better and retained good trim with the front tank full and the rear empty. She never got bow down, yet there was always that extra weight to help out on a "head sea" ride.
                            Ole Joe
                            Just floundering around
                            White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                            1978 Mako 25

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