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Making repairs to gelcoat chips

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  • Making repairs to gelcoat chips

    Wondering if anyone has any experience with repairs to gelcoat chips. I am looking at MarineTec and good old white gelcoat. Not sure I can match the color skeme, I just have a few spots where the gelcoat is chipped all the way down to the fiberglass matting and I don't want water to get into there. Anyone have any thoughts?

  • #2
    There are lots of ways to do this. Much of it depends on how big the chips are, but unless they are huge and way into the glass then you can probably just use gel coat. www.minicraft.com carries matching gelcoat for all years of makos. There are also lots of places that will do custom matches for you.

    It gets more complicated from there. Gelcoat will never completely cure in the air without addatives or at least PVA sprayed on top.
    1975 23\' Tampa,FL

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    • #3
      I have the same question about chips in gel coat. Where can you learn to the repairs? Mine are just cosmetic.
      1984 Mako 238, 2000 Yamaha 250[br]Long Island, NY

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      • #4
        You could probably do a search on any multitude of sites, start with this and www.thehulltruth.com. Some one else could probably chime in with and exact location. There are also lots of videos out there I know Bennett marine puts out quite a few.
        1975 23\' Tampa,FL

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        • #5
          Thankyou for the links to the Manufactures / suppliers of the gelcoat etc.
          1973 22 CC Milford, CT USA[br]

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          • #6
            Don't use Marine Tex anywhere near gelcoat. Its an epoxy and it WILL inhibit the cure of gelcoats. If you have major filling to do, use 3M premium filler (its a vinylester filler.. great stuff)

            Go here: http://www.bennettmarine.com/fiberglass_repair.html

            I have the Fiberglass Repairs Made Easy set. I learned a ton from it. In the Vol. 2 video, he makes gelcoat repairs on a Mako 19.

            The videos combinded with the already matched gelcoat from Minicraft and their instructions, you'll do fine. If you get your gelcoat from Minicraft with the surfacing wax added you don't have to over coat with PVA. Thats how I get my gelcoat (wax added).

            If your going to spray over your putty repairs, then I recommend getting some patch reducer from Minicraft as well. All the guys at Minicraft will take time to talk you through the process. Good guys over there.
            Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

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            • #7
              Do these videos also show how to fix spider cracks?

              Or do you have another suggestions for those, I have them along my side boxes on the 224.
              84\' 224[br]houston, tx

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              • #8
                Its really pretty easy.

                As stated above, minicraft has matching colors, as well, your local dealer may carry it. Realize the color match wont be exact as your gellcoat changes color a bit due to the sun; but my hull originally came out of Fla, though I can see where I've filled holes in the dash and other repairs, I'm probably the only one as I know where I'm looking and what I've done. From a few feet away, you cant notice. I will say too that I've had much better results with the wax added stuff.

                Basically, what I do is cover the area with clear packing tape, then cout out 1/8" around the 'ding'. I apply the gellcoat over the ding with a plastic putty knife, then pull the tape off. This leaves only a few thousandths that have to be sanded down. Sand, ending with like an 800 or 1000 wet sand and you wont know it existed. I was really surprised how easy it was to make a quality repair that looks almost as good as new.
                1990 261 T/2001 200 HPDIs[br]Basking Ridge/Mantoloking NJ[br]

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                • #9
                  I do it just like makorider, only I use the blue painter's masking tape. When sanding, I start w/ 100 and get it "close". From there I go to 150, 220, 320 wet, 400 wet, 600 wet, 1500 wet and then wax.
                  Brian[br]St. Leonard, MD

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