Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Another newbie

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Another newbie

    Just joined the site. A friend of mine mentioned this site and I've spent the past two week combing over thousands of posts educating myself. My hat is off to many of you as I have picked up many tips from you.

    I've owned many boats, but currently have a 1987 Mako 20 with a 200 Yamaha, which I think is one of the best boats I've ever owned. I purchased the boat in FL 6 years ago and brought it back to MA. I was surprised how much cheaper center console boats are in FL compared to MA.

    I'm sure I'll be posting often.

    Thanks and regards,

    David M[]
    Current Mqko - 1990 Mako 211 w/2006 250 E-TEC. http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6226. [br]- Previous Makos 1987 20C, 1979 23\' IB, 1970s 17 Angler

  • #2
    My project list for spring:

    - Install 2 new Rolls batteries and relocate to console.

    - Sandblast bowrail, spray with self etching primer and white imron

    - varnish all teak (done yearly)

    - install SeaStop scuppers

    - Pulling engine to sandblast and repaint

    - While engine is pulled I will install new pistons and rings

    - Replace teak swim platform with a glassed unit (I will make)

    - Replace console cover and have a leaning post cover made

    I'm curious and was looking for feedback on trim tabs and T-tops, specifically from 20' owners. I'm very tempted to remove the tabs because I have found little use for them. Does anyone else find this? I was also curious to get an idea on what a T-top adds for weight. I know this is a loaded question, but a rough idea would be great.

    Thanks,

    David M
    Current Mqko - 1990 Mako 211 w/2006 250 E-TEC. http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6226. [br]- Previous Makos 1987 20C, 1979 23\' IB, 1970s 17 Angler

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't know about the trim tabs, but the T-Top itself doesn't way much. Of course it depends on how elaborate of a top you get and if you choose a hard top versus canvas and/or an electronics box. The top on my boat weighs less than 100 pounds...I think they said it was about 60.
      Formerly: Mako 236[br]Currently: 35\' Viking[br]Greenwich, CT

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:


        Originally posted by Putnam


        Don't know about the trim tabs, but the T-Top itself doesn't way much. Of course it depends on how elaborate of a top you get and if you choose a hard top versus canvas and/or an electronics box. The top on my boat weighs less than 100 pounds...I think they said it was about 60.



        Same with my first one. The one factor you need to think about, which I didn't until first hand experience hit, was how much pressure wind had on it (like a sail). That pressure will add weight/drag when running or docking.
        St. Pete Beach, FL

        Comment


        • #5
          not to sound like a jerk...but...you shouldn't varnish or paint teak because it won't hold!! teak should be cleaned and oiled. or better yet replaced with star board{HE HE HE}. but reallyteak shouldn't be varnished.a good alternative is to really clean the teak allow to dry fully than sand it smooth the coat it in west system epoxy-between cotes just "rough"it with scotch brite pads than put on the next coat untill the grain in the teak has dissapeared at this point the teak is clean and brite and full sealed-up keep is now waxing the epoxy surface or a primer and awgrip can be applied to the surface.but varnish will peel as will paint.

          Comment


          • #6
            Wow, thats a good grocery list, I too have restored a 20 and they are a great boat. They are rather flat and maybe thats why the trim tabs dont affect them that much. You must be fairly handy if your going to attemt a rebuild on the outboard. I think thats great.

            Keep us posted. dave. P.S. I varnished all my teek also and it looks great(for now) but we dont have the intense sun up here.
            [br]1994 Mako 215 Dual console Optimax 225[br]1978 Mako 19 with 90hp johnson[br]1996 Mako 22[br]1982 Mako 171 Angler 135 Black Max Mercury[br]1987 21b 225 Yamaha[br]1974 23 inboard Gusto gone.[br]1979m21 225johnson \"blue dolphin\" bought off this board and restored [br]with everyone\'s help!!Gone but not Forgotten....[br]1979 20 Mako 115 Suzuki gone[br]1977 19 Mako 115 Johnson gone[br]1976 23 Mako twin 140 Johnsons gone[br]1983 224 with closed transom and bracket[br]And 162 SOB (some other boats)[br]Venice Florida, Traverse city Mi.

            Comment


            • #7
              Jawz,

              Thanks for the feedback and you do not sound like a jerk. Varnish on teak is not that much of an issue in the northeast. We get about 5 months of boating a year and a simple sanding and a light coat a varnish is all that's needed before the May splash. I know to many varnish is sin, but I grew up helping my folks do the brightwork on a large sailboat, so a few hours a year is not that big of a deal. I tried a similar approach to your suggetions on my mahogany mailbox, but wood is not quite as dimensionally stable as West and Awgrip and it split the surface allowing water penetration. I have not had this issue with my boat and used my mail box as the beta test. I'm guessing it's the temp extremes, 95 in the summer and down to -10 in the past several winters.

              David M
              Current Mqko - 1990 Mako 211 w/2006 250 E-TEC. http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6226. [br]- Previous Makos 1987 20C, 1979 23\' IB, 1970s 17 Angler

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Michigan Dave,

                I'm about the same lattitide as you living is Salem MA. "Combined Effort" gets about 5 months use per year and sits under cover on a trailer the other 7 months. My list this year is long, but then again, we have received double the average snowfall and I'm ready to lauch the boat...

                I've decided to lose the tabs as I have never really used them and the new scupper I want to install interferes with the mounts. The engine I will know more when I perform a compression check and I will do this is the next several weeks. I've worked on these engines before while working at a dealership in my college days and they are much easier than people think. It's the 4-strokes, HPDI, Ficht that scare me. I'm happy to pay an extra $300+ per year in fuel for something that I know is very simple with fewer parts to break and is very easy and cheap to fix. I started my own "dealership" years ago to buy from PMC, American and other rebuild companies for myself and friends. I was surprised how easy it was to set up.

                David M
                Current Mqko - 1990 Mako 211 w/2006 250 E-TEC. http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=6226. [br]- Previous Makos 1987 20C, 1979 23\' IB, 1970s 17 Angler

                Comment


                • #9
                  Welcome aboard dtmackey []

                  Yep, 2-stroke engines are simple... During high school I worked at a motorcycle repair shop fixing bikes for free just to hang out and to chase the owner's daughter. []

                  My pay was anything I could build out of the junk pile. I ended up building a '72 Suzuki 500 twin 2-stroke street bike. What a cool deal! I wish I still had that bike - Any of y'all remember Hodaka bikes? Built one of those too for dirt trails.

                  Built a few outboards and cars since then, but those bikes were a blast. I don't know why I just rememberd all that! Fun times, nothing to do but play.
                  [br]***[br]\'82 Ski Nautique - Lake Martin, AL[br]\'80 236IB - Lake Martin, AL[br]\'03 Pursuit 2670 - Destin, FL

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X