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Calling__Ed Mancini......Ed Mancini you have a que

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  • Calling__Ed Mancini......Ed Mancini you have a que

    Ed,

    I Noticed you had replaced the breaker panel on your boat. How hard was it to do? I am thinking I might do the same and wanted to get some idea

    of how much of a pain was it.

    Thanks,

    Sam
    Apex NC [br]

  • #2
    Holy Smoke-

    Nice boat.

    I just got back from NC...was there attending sales seminar at Grady White and Jones Brothers factories.

    Did you hear about the guy in Morehead City that was harpooning a giant and he got fouled up in the line and the fish pulled him over and he drown? Later in the day another fisherman found his boat drfting by itself and when they got on board they noticed the harpoon line in the water. When they pulled the line back in the boat they found it was still connected to a giant bluefin and the fisherman (his ankles were tangled in the 200ft of line). Scary stuff.

    Anyway...the instrument panel is not too difficult if you have any wiring experience. When I did it, I had ZERO wiring experience and had to get a friend to show me how to do it all. The panel cost about $130 from Marine connection Liquidators in FT PIERCE. Definitely a worthy upgrade in my opinion.

    Let me know if you have questions.

    Ed

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    • #3
      Bruce was an old fishing buddie from thrity years ago, a very capable guy in the sea, and a freak accident for sure. There was another fellow that I taught how to rig his first bait for marlin fishing, in his youth, that was pulled overboard by a Blue Marlin at the stern of the boat, in another freak accident during 1994-5 that just exibited how quick things can happen, even the the most experienced guys of the sea.

      Story:

      "While leadering an estimated 250-pound blue marlin off North Carolina during the 1994 Big Rock tournament, Chris Bowie was pulled over the side and disappeared under the surface, never to come up again. Just last year off San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sigfredo Santana suffered the same fate while leadering a 700-pound blue. Each man was a seasoned mate, fishing with experienced tournament anglers and captains who watched the excitement of bringing a large fish to boatside turn to sheer horror in a flash.

      Both accidents occurred because of leaders - leaders so long that these men had to "leader" or "wire" the fish to pull it close enough to tag or gaff. This process really should be referred to as "hand lining" because that's exactly what happens when anglers can reel in their line only to the swivel before someone else must pull in the entire leader by hand. Thirty feet, 20 feet, even 10 feet is a long way. Serious accidents can occur at this stage of the end game".

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