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Considering Mako 17, need recomendations

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  • Considering Mako 17, need recomendations

    I am considering buying a 1988 Mako 17 from a friend of mine, the boat is all stock and has an 88' yami 115. Also includes a galv. trailer which is in good condition (needs bunk boards). The boat is going to need rewiring, but other than that it looks good. He is asking $4,000 for it. Is this a reasonable price? Also, are there any particualar potential weaknesses that I should watch out for on this model (both boat and motor).
    Trey[br]Clinton, SC[br]No boat, working on that.

  • #2
    I'll leave the technical stuff to the experts on the site. I am not one of them. However, I bought a 96' Mako 17 this summer. I LOVE it! Great little boat. If I have any advice, make sure the outboard is healthy. To repower, your $4K cost could easily be $10K plus. I paid $10K for mine. It included a 96 115 Yamaha Saltwater Series, trailer and a very nice GPS. Boat was in great condition. Good luck.

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    • #3
      As said, considering the motor is strong, that would be a good deal. Just because you are buying it from a friend, don't be afraid to have a mechanic check the motor out (you don't want a lemon to ruin your friendship, but that's beside the point). A 115 on that boat is going to be sweet.

      What to look for? Mostly soft deck and transom. Walk around the deck on your knees and you'll be able to find soft spots better than if you hop up and down on it on your feet. As for the transom (i'll try to remember the technique), there is a trick where you lock the motor in the up position and push and pull up and down on the end of the motor. Have someone look at the transom and if it's soft, it should be fairly apparent. Maybe Bobby will chime in to say if I got that right or not.

      Other stuff like soggy foam or bad tank is harder to investigate and should be left to either a professional surveyor or a time when you want to really rip the boat apart (for $4K, i wouldn't bother with a surveyor, and if the deck is fine, I wouldn't worry about the foam.)

      I paid $1500 for mine (w/ '85 motor and roller trailer), but it needed plenty of work. I'd rewire mine a hundred times to have a 115 on it. []
      \'72 Mako 17, Suzuki 140 FOR SALE[br]\'74 Mako 19B Project FOR SALE[br]Seabird 21 Project FOR SALE[br]San Juan 28 sailboat [br]Wake, VA[br][IMG]

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      • #4
        Oh, and put your hometown and state in your signature... there may be a Mako owner nearby that can help you.

        -Skibum

        PS: If you don't buy that boat, I WANT IT.
        \'72 Mako 17, Suzuki 140 FOR SALE[br]\'74 Mako 19B Project FOR SALE[br]Seabird 21 Project FOR SALE[br]San Juan 28 sailboat [br]Wake, VA[br][IMG]

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        • #5
          You did perfect mubikS.[] the only thing I would add is to have someone else do the pushing and pulling. You be the one to look for movement. It should NOT flex at all.

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          • #6
            To expand a bit on the engine:

            Yams of that era SUCK when it comes to corrosion protection. The shift rod in those is regular old carbon steel, and they tend to...guess what...rust out and break. We pulled the powerheads off our 200s four years ago because of wrist pin issues(uh...getting the ph's off is a whole 'nother story on rustbucket yams) and our shift rods, originally 3/8", had melted down to, maybe, and I mean maybe,
            bottom line...see if the shift rods have been replaced. If not...dont figure ANY value into that engine, even if its a strong runner with goood compression.
            1990 261 T/2001 200 HPDIs[br]Basking Ridge/Mantoloking NJ[br]

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            • #7
              Sounds like a good deal. I'd still vote for the surveyor or at least a mechanic to look the engine over. It wouldn't cost much and it could save a friendship down the road. I sold a boat to one of my best friends and insisted that a mechanic have a look at the 2 year old motor.
              SCMako17[br]1990 Mako 230 WA[br]Yamaha 200 2-stroke[br]Greenville, SC

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              • #8
                Another thing I noticed on my boat that you may want to check for, but may not necessarily mean any structural problems: All the way around the gunnel, except for the aft three feet or so, is a roughly 3/4" lip... you'll know what i'm talking about when you look at the boat. The aft ends of that lip have stress fractures... apparently the glass and core are different thicknesses and it's a stress point. You may find some water intrusion here, but if the whole area is not soft, any water will have just run down to the bilge. There is a recent thread mentioning laying a strip of glass over this to correct the problem. Filling with Marine-Tex or the like does NOT solve the problem.
                \'72 Mako 17, Suzuki 140 FOR SALE[br]\'74 Mako 19B Project FOR SALE[br]Seabird 21 Project FOR SALE[br]San Juan 28 sailboat [br]Wake, VA[br][IMG]

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                • #9
                  I am considering repowering my 1974 17 Mako with it's 4th engine. The best I can manage for a rebuilt 90 hp Evinrude is $3,800 and a new Johnson is $5,300. So 4 grand for boat, motor and trailer is an awsome deal!
                  Chris Miller[br]Mystic Islands, NJ[br]1974 17 Classic[br]1988 211 Classic (sold)[br]1990 Grady White 230 Gulfstream (sold)[br][img][br]

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                  • #10
                    Sounds like a good deal. If the boat is solid you are way ahead of the game. Most of us spent that just to make our boats sound. I love my 17s Im sure you will too.

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                    • #11
                      There is a new '04 171 on the www.bayracermarine.com website for 12500.00 with out a motor.

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                      • #12
                        The new Makos are realy a dissapointment. They are very over priced and built cheaply. Just my oppinion.

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                        • #13
                          I CAN'T COMPARE TO OLDER ONE'S. I HAD A 2000 17 FOR ALMOST 4 YEARS AND I PUT IT UP AGAINST ANY 17'IN ROUGH WATER. I HAD A 115 MERC ON MINE AND COULD RUN 40+. I WENT OUT OF WORST INLETS IN FL @ BOYNTON BEACH AND ONCE I GOT MY FEET UNDER ME IT WAS PIECE OF CAKE--JUST MY OPINION--JIM
                          JFB

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                          • #14
                            Tarp, I didnt mean to sound disrepectfull I guess Im just stuck on the old die hard quality of hand built boats. That also applise to big yachts. If you look a my latest post the 82' boat I work on constantly is a prime example of poor workmanship. That thing is an 03 and we are into that thing for many thousands of dollars of things that should have been done at the factory and at shake down.

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                            • #15
                              Regardless of quality, I don't see how anyone can justify $17K+ for a 17' boat. ( and that's along the same lines of somehow justifying leaving a million $ yacht in FL during hurricane season without checking on it once... and then having it totalled
                              I would buy a $7K boat and pay a local boatbuilder/ refinisher/ refitter $10K to make it a real cherry before I would buy something off the showroom floor. That goes for trucks too. And women. $10K of plastic surgery can really get you something these days![88]
                              \'72 Mako 17, Suzuki 140 FOR SALE[br]\'74 Mako 19B Project FOR SALE[br]Seabird 21 Project FOR SALE[br]San Juan 28 sailboat [br]Wake, VA[br][IMG]

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