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  • Twin Engines

    My boat is a `90 model 210 Cuddy with a Johnson 225. I fish the Gulf of Mexico and would like to have twin four strokes. Even twin 90hp Suzukis weigh over 800 lbs which seems like too much for this transom. Does anybody actually know what the transom is rated for?

    I wouldn`t mind moving up to a larger Mako (23 or 25 footer), but they appear to have identical transoms to the 21. Yet they carry twins for many years.

    One more question while I have your attention: What is the secret code for these model numbers? How is a 250 different from a 254 or a 248? What is the significance of the last digit?

    Great forum guys. Thanks for any help you can offer.
    dauphin island, alabama

  • #2
    Baldwin,

    That boat was designed for operation with a single outboard. Max hp is 230, so you're right where you want to be.

    Why the desire for twins? Is your current o/b reliable? Is it an issue of performance?

    I'm assuming the 225 Johnson is a conventional 2-stroke with VRO. If you're looking for better fuel/oil economy, take a look at Johnson's 225hp 4-stroke (it's a Suzuki) or Evinrude's 225hp Ficht -- they're excellent for fuel and oil economy.

    Tom
    Prop Blast[br]Mako 224, F225[br]Tampa, FL

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    • #3
      It runs real well with the 225, but I`m wanting to venture farther offshore and like the idea of a spare engine back there. So it looks like I need to trade up (ah shucks). I prefer an old hull (walkaround) with new engines. Do you know which of the 25 versions has the deep V or do they all? Thanks for your help
      dauphin island, alabama

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      • #4
        Baldwin,

        The 25' CC Mako evolved over the years. Up through 1983 it was known as the Mako 25; max hp was 300hp and the hull had a notched transom with 25" height. In 1984, the model was renamed the Mako 254; max hp was increased to 370hp and the buyer had a choice of either a 25 or 30" transom. The 258 was the cuddy version (not a walkaround) -- everything else was the same.

        In 1989, the name was changed to the Mako 251 -- little or nothing was changed. Though you did have an optional 50 gal auxilary fuel tank -- bringing the the total fuel capacity up to 200 gallons.

        The Mako 248 was a cuddy boat with a full transom and bolt on bracket. Max hp was around 280 I believe.

        For more specifics, check the Mako website at http://mako-boats.com and click the link on the left side for spec's on the older Makos.

        Tom
        Prop Blast[br]Mako 224, F225[br]Tampa, FL

        Comment


        • #5
          A major change that you can't identify in the specs is the change to the cockpit and fish box going from the 25 to the 254.

          The Model 25 (sometimes called the 250) had a large fish box that seperated the cockpit from the motors. You can see it on Sean's and Carpet Diem's project boats. The fish box was removed in the 254 which provided more cockpit room. The 254 fish boxes are located below deck and a flush deck runs to the transom. Water entry to the deck is controlled with a hinged panel in front of the engine(s).
          Ole Joe
          Just floundering around
          White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
          1978 Mako 25

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          • #6
            How far offshore is farther?
            [br]***[br]\'82 Ski Nautique - Lake Martin, AL[br]\'80 236IB - Lake Martin, AL[br]\'03 Pursuit 2670 - Destin, FL

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            • #7
              Occasionally as far as 50 miles. We usually stay within 20 miles or so now just because theres lots of company in that range, but it can be lonely any farther out.

              what about a 23 footer? Will the 23 transom withstand the weight of two 4 strokes,,,say two 115`s which run around 900 lbs or so? Sounds like a sweet rig if it will hold the weight.
              dauphin island, alabama

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              • #8
                pbaldwin I missed welcoming you aboard.[] Please put your hometown/state in your siginature. It helps us help you. Your about 50miles from me.[]

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                • #9
                  Bobby is putting twin 4-stroke Suzi's on his 23' rig when he's done.

                  Bobby what are they again, 140's?
                  Steven[br]1978 Powercat 232[br]One flat broke, the other almost ready to float!!![br]Atlanta, GA

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                  • #10
                    Yep, DF-140 Suzzy's. 4strokes. 2003's with 10hrs on them.[]

                    They need to be out of the crate's and on my boat.[:0]

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                    • #11
                      We run 30 miles on single engines all the time........a tow service is a must. Anything over 30 we use the buddy system. I would suggest staying with a single engine and buddy up.....saftey in numbers

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                      • #12
                        why not get a kicker? A 9.9 or 15 hp will push you a long ways if needed, especially if it's a new 4-stroke. I am with you and like the idea of twins. There was an older Mako 20 in Gainesville that had twin Honda 90's on it. Never got to ride in it, but the owner said it ran well.
                        1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog
                        1985 Mako 20c - sold
                        Fort Walton Beach, FL
                        http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=42841

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                        • #13
                          When Bobby hangs the twin 140's on his 23, they will be on a bracket with additional buoyancy provided. I don't think you can compare his results to hanging them directly on the transom of a stock 23.

                          All the 25's had a deep vee hull - 23 degrees at the transom.
                          Ole Joe
                          Just floundering around
                          White Hall & Ocean City, Maryland
                          1978 Mako 25

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Here is my opinion on this subject and it may sound a bit negative towards twin's, particularly coming from someone who has a 23 footer with twin's, but there is a lot to consider in this decision. I went through a lot of this same thought process when I decided to purchase twins for my boat. Over the years I have come to rely on them for reasons that I never considered. Like, if you learn how to use them you will never be embarrassed at the fuel dock again.

                            Today's modern outboard engines are not what they used to be. They are very reliable and don't fail if you maintain them properly. Things do go wrong and obviously out of the thousands and thousands of hours spent boating each year some engines fail, but I wouldn't go into the decision about single versus twins based only on the perceived value of peace of mind. Unless you've done careful study and tested your setup you are just as likely to be stuck somewhere between here and there because you ran out of fuel as you are to get back home. A boat setup for twins is not very efficient when running on one.

                            Only once have I been faced with running the boat on one and that was my fault. It was not easy on the engine or me.

                            Two engines will add a significant amount of initial and on-going cost to your setup and unless you are running a large boat (or one specifically designed for twins like most cats) that needs more than 200 or 225HP then you are better off sticking with one. Also bear in mind that you have to be able to carry enough fuel to manage your worst case scenario. This for example, may be coming home from 50+ miles on one engine in rough water. You definitely don't want this financial out-lay to over shadow the more important safety gear you need to have to even consider going 50+ miles offshore. I flashed past a telephone pole 38 miles offshore once so close I could have almost reached out and touched it. So, what I'm saying is that in my opinion you need to consider that something might happen offshore that is just as or more troublesome than an engine failure: rough weather, wave over the transom, breaking a through hull, etc., that can jeopardize your boat. Consider all these things when going offshore in a small boat and be safe.

                            One other thing on brackets, unless the bracket is designed to provide dynamic floatation, i.e. buoyancy while on plane, then the weight of the engines on the bracket will be multiplied by their distance from the transom. This will affect your on-plane trim and tend to push the bow up. So, keep this in mind when thinking about bracketed outboards and their affect on your boat's trim.

                            For what its worth.
                            [br]***[br]\'82 Ski Nautique - Lake Martin, AL[br]\'80 236IB - Lake Martin, AL[br]\'03 Pursuit 2670 - Destin, FL

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Good points DestinBound. The only time I needed the Coast Gaurd (pre-tow Boat days) was because I picked up water in our fuel tanks which stopped those twin yammaies real quick. I can tell you first hand that the sunset from 30 miles south of Destin is real pretty, but not fun when you are all alone.

                              Being prepared is the key to going offshore and anything can happend regardless of your motor setup...but I still love the sound of twin engines that are sycnhronized and humming along!
                              1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog
                              1985 Mako 20c - sold
                              Fort Walton Beach, FL
                              http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=42841

                              Comment

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