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  • Brett,

    I grew up in Stuart, but I knew you grew up in Boca - my uncle built the first house in Boca Bay Colony back in the mid 70s and was very active with the "who's who" of Boca as he was one of the first veterinarians in the area. He says that my cousin Laura and your sister were actually roomamtes at UF. I'm not sure if your sis did room with a Laura Laughlin or not, but its interesting nonetheless. You grew up in Boca's heyday... now its just overextended people living in overpriced homes who are paying for overpriced property insurance and taxes! Anyway, thanks for the well wishes with the boat. I plan on keeping her as long as she's afloat.

    Dennis

    P.S.. Did you guys do factory transom conversions often?
    Dennis[br]Boca Raton, FL[br]1993 241B[br]Twin 200 Yamahas[br]

    Comment


    • quote:


      Originally posted by Seaplane1978


      Hey Ringleader,

      I hate to throw him under the bus, (or boat) but maybe a better way to help this community, can we give Brett his own forum? Maybe you two could come up with a better idea...just a thought. Thank you both for this platform for all of us.[)][)][)][)][)][)]



      I'm going to leave that completely up to Brett. But this thread here is why ClassicMako.com exists. The info exchange just can't get any better. I hope Brett can stay and play for many years to come.
      Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

      Comment


      • ChuckB

        It was a great summer gig. I was 15 and worked on a rebuilt 1920 shuttle boat that took people from the hotel to the beach club.

        Boca Dennis,

        I forgot to break down your MRK. Yours was hull #228."G" represents August The "C" is the model (241) "3" is 1993 calender year and 93 is for 1993 model year. We did not do any factory conversions but we did provided bracketless full transoms for dealers that wanted to do their own bracket systems. Send me a picture of the transom area and I will tell if it is one of ours.We moved to BR in 1977 and I moved on to Miami Lakes when I started with the factory in 1985. Parents sold out in late 80's before the big run up. It was a great town back in the day a real old type florida town. Do not know much about it now as I have not been down in 10 years. Stuart was a great place to , we spent plenty of time there. I will check with my sisiters about her roommates back in school.

        RingLeader Hows little dude, is he off the light blanket yet? I like the thread. It has great reference points from the first discussion on so lets keep it like we have it unless you think it will benefit more in a different format. My best to the family.

        Brett

        Comment


        • Brett,

          These are pix that the previous owner sent me before I bought the boat, if you need anything further to show you what you need to see just let me know.

          P.S. Thanks for breaking out my MRK#! Does C mean 241 or 241B or did you guys not simplify it that much?

          Dennis






          Dennis[br]Boca Raton, FL[br]1993 241B[br]Twin 200 Yamahas[br]

          Comment


          • BocaDennis,

            We didn't breakout the cutout 241 from the bracket model in the Mrk #'s.The photos show that it is a Mako Bracket and it looks like a full transom from the deck cap. Is there a space under the interior transom insert or does it go all the way to the deck. I can tell from the lifting eyes that it was built during the time I ran the production and I believe that it is a regular 241b not a conversion.

            Brett

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            • Dennis,

              Gotta say i'm totally jealous. That is my dream Mako for sure. Steep entry and beamy. A true fishing machine. Are those OX66's? Sweet! After I'm done with my 17A I'll be searching for one of those hulls. I think it rivals the Bluewater 2350.

              Brett,

              Again, I echo the others from this site in saying what a pleasure it is to have you aboard and how much we all appreciate the job your Dad and you did in producing a line of boats for the ages.

              As far as the 241 and 241b is concerned, were you the principle designer? It seems a departure from the narrower beamed boats aside from the 261, or is it(as some have suggested) built from blocking off the 261 mold? I am totally locked into this hull as my next due to the inherent seaworthiness. I've fished the 254's and their successors and found them to pitch a little more than this hull when drift fishing abeam and love the stability. It reminds me of a smaller Ocean Master in it's general feel when at drift. Remarkable for a (at the time) midsized craft. I only wish you guys had built a 242 for the increased running surface. I guess I'm a frustrated designer at heart.
              Tight lines, greasy hair & gin clear water[br]1978 17 Angler[br]1989 Yamaha 90ETLF[br]Boynton Beach, FL[br]\'56 40ft Dutch Orca steel ketch(one of three in existence)[br]in NY

              Comment


              • Sunlion333,

                The 261 was under way as I arrived and I was able to take part in the testing. We went through several prototype hulls before we got it production ready inn 1986.The prototype was called "Drop Back" and it had a pair of 225 evinrudes. We introduced at the Key West Owners tournament and blew everone away as it had been a secret.I do not think any one can lay claim to being the principle desoigner as with most new hulls at Mako they were a collaberation of several people with the final ok for production being my dads. The 241 was a modification to the 261 and from mid console forward it is exactly the same. From there back it needed some adjusting in the lifting starkes, the deadrise and the radius of the transom. We arrived at these changes was by running and mofify a 261 hull with bondo and plywood until we found the balance we always looked for in our hulls.Then we flipped it, popped a dirty mold and made a plug. The 241 also had one other hurdle as we needed it to run well with a single engine as well as twins, something not even considered when we designed the 261.The 241 b was simply a full transom verion with a new deck.We did make a 241 with an integrated bracket and it was one of my last designs before leaving. We called it the 262. I do not know how many are out there but I would bet there is a hundred or so. Let me know if you find one

                Brett

                Brett

                Comment


                • Brett-

                  Was 'Drop Back' a yellow hull with a red name on the side?? made the cover of SWS at one point?? If so, I remember that cover well. At the time, we had the 17, and was when I said 'some day' to my father.

                  We need you start another thread discussing hull dynamics, how lifting strakes work, etc[]
                  1990 261 T/2001 200 HPDIs[br]Basking Ridge/Mantoloking NJ[br]

                  Comment


                  • Hello Brett

                    I have a couple of questions. I have a 1975 Mako 17 Angler.

                    The one you built for your dad that is now for sale,do you know what brand of trailer that it is on. I like the low slung design as my legs are nor what they used to be for climbing in & out on a high trailer.

                    What is the difference and when did you start the 18 ft flats boat. Is it a extended 17 and is there a difference in the draft

                    Thanks for all the info

                    Alabat
                    Alabat - Cajun for \"Hey over there\"[br]1973 - 17 Mako Angler 115HP Suzuki[br]Houma, Louisiana[br]Home of the best Red fishing in the world

                    Comment


                    • makorider

                      Drop Back was a white hull but she did have a blue and red logo. I was on the cover of Saltwater Back in 1986 I think and it had a feature inside. Good memory. Discussing hull dynamics and lifting strakes would best be debated by engineers(which I am not).Applying practical knowledge of what makes a hull do what it should do even when the formulas say it won't, is right up my alley, so I will do what I can to help.

                      Brett

                      Comment


                      • alabat

                        That was a trailer we made at the factory. We had started looking at the possiblities of producing them for all models up to the 21 but it proved to not be feasable.The 181 was a completely new hull with no lineage to any previous Makos.I had been trying to find one of Dads original 19's to restore for our 25th anniversary but was unable to do so.I then thought about what he designed the original 19 to do and realized it was in essence a flats boat. I decided to design what I would want to fish the same waters with in 1992 and the 181 is the result.Some say it was to beamy for a flats but I was going for a wide,stable,dry platform that I could fish from with out getting tossed in the water and be able to handle the bay chop without rattling my teeth.I also wanted to be able to tow one to the bahamas behing a 261 so I could fish all parts of the islands. It was the only project I didn't tell my dad about until it was done.

                        Brett

                        Comment


                        • Brett,

                          Talking with Dad tonight, he wanted me to ask you an interesting question... What did you guys do with all of the molds that you and your Dad designed when you guys had to turn things over?

                          Also, if you have a chance. Our hull number was very hard to read...this is the best we can do. Is it complete?

                          11873074-M22B [?]

                          Can't thank you enough for your time []

                          Comment


                          • Seaplane1978

                            All the molds that were in production as well as most of the plugs went with the company as they were the real value along with the name,drawings and of course our reputation. Some of the plugs had been destroyed by the Hurricane(andrew)and we had not replaced at the time of the offering. The older non current models (1975-1985) had been filled with concrete and sunk on an artificial reef project off of Pompnao Beach Florida in the late 80's.The tooling prior to that had been destroyed in the plant fire in the early 70's. The hull id number took several variartions btween 1967 and 1975 and it would appear that you have one of those. It looks like it is missing one number on either the front or back. Was this number in teh gelcoat or on a tag. do you still have your coast guard capacity plate, If so does it have 4 numbers embossed in a painted area. Some time running a pencil over a thin piece of paper will give you an impression that is invisible to the eye. Let me know.

                            I do know that it was a 1974 model 22b and it was either hull munber 1187 or 1873 depending where you are missing a number.Hope that helps

                            Brett

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                            • Brett,

                              This is working out to be a great thread; been said already but thanks for all the info. I followed you in Boca by a couple years. I graduated from Boca High in '92, and was in the area until about '97. Really no place I have been that compares to S. Florida for the variety of fishing, and I have not seen many boats that could get you to everything like the 17'. We had it rigged primarily for running the kite for sails, but hit the flats in Lower Matecumbe and Venice a few times as well. Awesome, awesome boat. I almost talked myself into trying Bimini in it but never had the stones to pull the trigger. Well, and the title had my Dad's name on it, so that played a little part as well.

                              I always wondered what the lifting strakes would have done for that hull. You mentioned not wanting to put them on, and I have noticed some of the newer 17's have them. What were the pro's and con's on that decision, or was it a "not broke, don't fix" thing.
                              Sold the 17\', moved to FL... I need a new handle.[br]1991 Jupiter 31, current project[br]2005 Everglades 243, sold[br]2012 Contender 23 Open sold[br]1989 Intrepid 246 WA--gone to Australia[br]1973 Mako 17--sold with regrets[br]1992 Mako 17--started it all[br]Pompano, FL

                              Comment


                              • Texas 17

                                I would have to agree,the 17 had it all especially for South Florida. Bimini in the 17 was a handfull and one I would only equate with youthfull foolishness (and a buddy in a 25 behind me). I would never do it again and would kill my kids if one of them tried it. Thankfully my dad never found out about it or I would still be dry docked. The 17 was designed with out the stakes so that you can turn her on her sides and slide across the flats. With the the immediate flare in the keel coupled with the modified hull that started forward of the console she had all the lift she needed and a real stable feel at idle. A guy my size could walk the gunnels working a fish and not get tossed. By lengthening and kicking the chines down she stayed dry as a bone through most chop and provided an edge that caught you before you slid on its side. The only benefit strakes would of added is a tighter turning radius and free her up a little bit to run faster, neither of which was needed in my opinion. The newer 17's I haven't seen, but if they are using the original 17 hull the strakes are simply window dressing, wont't hurt but not necessary. If they redesigned the hull then they are just plan crazy.

                                Brett

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