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Anybody ever run an early 70's 22 mako?

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  • Anybody ever run an early 70's 22 mako?

    I am looking at an early 70s mako 22. I have a 20' robalo right now that I hate the rough ride of the semi-v. Does anyone on here have that vintage boat that could give me the thumbs up or thumbs down? I dont want to get stuck with another bone shaker. We do most of our fishing withing 3 miles of the beach (New Jersey), but sometimes venture out 25 or 30 miles for tuna and sharks. If I proceed, I intend to power it with a pair of 115 Yamahas.

    Thanks!
    Currently Makoless[br]Huntingdon Valley, PA

  • #2
    Looking at Mako's spec's. they don't list the deadrise until 1980. Sounds like your wanting something in the 19deg mark for deadrise. I'm sure you know that all of this is a trade off. Low deadrise = less hp to push it, no snap roll at drift or anchor. Higher deadrise = more hp and fuel to push it. more snap roll at anchor or drift, plus easier on the bones at cruise.

    To check the deadrise of a boat your interested in. [on a trailer] Buy you one of these.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=34214



    Check and write down the reading on one side. Then check the other side and write that down. Add them together and devide by 2. This will give you the deadrise even if the trailer is not sitting level.[:x)]

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    • #3
      I know a guy that has had a Mako 22 since 1976. His name is Randy Dickens and he used to sell Makos. He has had at least ten engines on his boat. The Mako 22 (his is a 72 model) has a virtually flat bottom, like 14 degrees. It does very well with a 150HP engine, but the ride can be rough. You have to remember, in the early 70's the BIGGEST outboard you could buy was 150HP, and that was rated at the flywheel, not the prop. Great boat, but maybe not the deep vee monster that you are expecting.
      1987 Mako 254, 2013 Evinrude ETEC 175\'s (sold to my buddy)[br]1988 Mako 20, 2008 Yamaha 200HPDI (sold)[br]1984 Mako 17, 2005 Suzuki 115 (sold)[br]1981 Mako 21 (sold)[br]1978 Mako 17 (sold)[br]1986 Mako 260 (sold)[br]1997 Mako 232 (sold)[br]Tampa, Florida

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      • #4
        Thanks alot guys. I am not looking for a long term offshore boat. I am just looking for something that is better than the robalo that I have. Something to get me on the water dependably and semi comfortably. I have a newish yamaha 115 and would buy a match to it and run twins. I just want to be able to run in 1-2 chop without having to slow down to 12 knots while taking a cold bath, knots and a cold bath I could deal with []
        Currently Makoless[br]Huntingdon Valley, PA

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        • #5
          Reel Thing, I have a '72 22' (although the only Mako I have owned) and use it in the lowew Potomac and some in the Chesapeake where we guite often get 1-2 foot chops (and sometimes more). My co-fishers and I have given this boat a vote for "one of the best riders" (very good for our getting old and sometimes hung over conditions). I am not sure of the exact spec for the bottom deadrise, but can offer some credits for the top.
          72\' Mako 22\'[br]NoNeck, VA

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          • #6
            I had a '78 22. If ya plan on getting in anything bigger than 2 foot chop, ya better hope your dental work is quality. Those boats are absolute spinal compression machines.This is the only reason I got rid of mine, have a '88 21B now, rides like it has shock absorbers.

            The 70's 22s will beat ya to death.

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            • #7
              How does the 1979 Mako 23 CC hull compare? Haven't had mine wet yet...
              Bob Carpenter [br] Maine[br]1969 Boston Whaler 13\' (Annie3 1/2) [br]Built Annie2 and Annie3 which can be seen in The Project pages[br]

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              • #8
                Reelthang, I have a 1972 Mako 22 with a 200hp motor. As much as I love my boat, I do have to say it is a rough ride. I mainly use it inside the river, but do make occasional runs out in the ocean and it is definitely rough on the knees when going on long trips. I can only really make my comparison to a mid 80's mako 232 that I've been on. I posted my only pic of my boat I have from the bow, unforturnately the boat is stripped in this one. Maybe someone can look at the deadrise from the pic to give you an idea of what degree deadrise it has, to give you a better idea of what to look for.


                [br]Michael R. Delgado[br]1972 Mako 22[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=15745[br]1976 Mako 25[br]http://classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=18013&SearchTerms=mako,25[br]

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                • #9
                  I guess my main question/concern is...will it be better than a 1972 Robalo 20'? I cant imagine it being any worse. In my opinion, the speed on flat days, will outweigh getting wet on snotty days. I am guessing a rig like this will cruise mid 30s and top out mid 40s? Any other guesses?
                  Currently Makoless[br]Huntingdon Valley, PA

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                  • #10
                    The 1970's Mako 22 is a pretty flat and shallow draft hull. Not ideal for offshore, but great for bays. What you are looking for is a 1980's Mako 224 or a late 1980's Mako 231. Put twin 115's on either of those hulls and you'll be loving life!
                    Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

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                    • #11
                      Mr Delgado is right on.

                      I have a 76 22' that will flat out fly on relatively light seas (when the boat is not cut into pieces that is). I think the deadrise is 14-18 degrees, not sure. The boat will handle as much as you can take, but your legs, back and fillings will give out first. You WILL NOT get a soft ride in a short duration chop of any size out of this boat. You WILL get a solid boat that runs fast on good days and fishes well at anchor or slow troll speeds.

                      I fish the Delaware Bay with my boat where we can leave the dock with no wind and flat seas only to return in a 4-5' chop after the tide change[B)]. The best thing to do in any boat in those conditions is just simply slow down and put the bow to.

                      I would not trade mine for the Robalo's that I have been out in.
                      Greenwich, NJ[br]1976 22B

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                      • #12
                        I had a Evinrude 225 on my 22. Cruised around 30 and WOT, 19" ballistic SS @ 5800 RPM 42 MPH.

                        She was not that fast, my 21 with 225 Johnson, 21" OMC SST @ 6100 RPM 52 MPH.

                        2 x 115 will be a good match, but more weight than the single 225. I will be interested to see what ya get for numbers.

                        If you are young (under 40) and the 22 is used in protected waters, you will be fine, I am old and used mine in open ocean where it was common to get 3-5 footers with no backs, my knees and back suffer to this day.

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                        • #13
                          THANKS FOR ALL THE HELP. I AM STILL UP IN THE AIR AS TO WHAT TO DO. I COULD PUT THIS BOAT TOGETHER FOR A FEW GRAND FULLY EQUIPPED WITH FULL ELECTRONICS, NEW TRAILER AND TWIN ENGINES UNDER WARRANTY. IT SOUNDS LIKE, PRETTY MUCH, NO MATTER WHAT, IT WILL BE BETTER THAN THE ROBALO. SHEER SIZE ALONE SHOULD MAKE IT A SOFTER RIDE. AT LEAST AS SOFT AS YOU CAN BE WITH A 14 DEGREE DEADRISE. IF MY MEMORY SERVES ME CORRECT, I THINK THE ROBALO HAS AN 11 DEGREE DEADRISE AND AS CRAZY AS WE MAY BE, WE HAVE FISHED 25 MILES OFF. MY CREW AND I ARE ALL MID 20'S SO WE CAN TAKE A LITTLE BEATING. THIS IS ONLY A TEMPORARY BOAT TO GET THROUGH A FEW YEARS TO BETTER OUR FINANCIAL SITUATION.
                          Currently Makoless[br]Huntingdon Valley, PA

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                          • #14
                            Reelthing,

                            Where are you at? I think you said you are in NJ earlier? I am in southern NJ (the real southern NJ, not Cherry Hill).

                            Oh, and please turn off your allcaps. Feel like your yelling at us.

                            []

                            Delgado,

                            If I did not see your house in the pic, and your boat had a new bow pulpit on it, I would swear your were taking pics of my boat. They look almost identical right now.
                            Greenwich, NJ[br]1976 22B

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                            • #15
                              Sorry Shep I am home now. I use all caps at work (I am an engineer and we always use all caps on our plans, so when I jump back and forth I dont do the whole caps lock thing). I live outside of Philly right now and my parents are in Allentown. I fish for stripers in Raritan Bay and around the hook. If I run offshore I run out of Manasquan. This year we ran to Little Italy and Monster Ledge twice in the Robalo. We also ran to Sea Isle Ridge when the little bluefin were there in July. The majority of our fishing is within 3 miles of the beach, but we do like to run off sometimes. I have a whole fleet of boats, but that is a whole nother story. I have a 25 Grady that I have been trying to sell all summer. Right now we are just trying to get back on the water with something that I am not afraid to run. I dont mind a little but kicking here and there as long as I am on the water. The robalo we have is pretty much retired but everything on it is new. I want something to replace it until we establish better finances (ie, buy a house rather than another money pit boat [])
                              Currently Makoless[br]Huntingdon Valley, PA

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