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Wanted - Coosa scraps for 'ducer mount

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  • Wanted - Coosa scraps for 'ducer mount

    Hi all,

    I'll shortly be installing a Garmin 2006 with GSD-20 sounder and a transom mount transducer, and am looking for a few composite scraps to use as a transducer mounting plate on the transom, and as a wiring patch-panel board for inside the console. Does anyone have any appropriate scraps they'd mind parting with?

    I like the idea of using a mounting plate on the transom, but most people talk of using Starboard, so you still have to bolt the starboard to the transom as 5200 will not bind starboard (to the transom). But I believe 5200 will bind Coosa, and Coosa will hold a screw for the transducer. Any differing opinion / better ideas?

    Then, for a wiring panel inside the console, Coosa just seems a cleaner solution than using plywood.

    So, if anyone's got any scraps, I'm looking. Will happily pay postage and/or some nominal price for the material.

    Thanks -
    NYC & L.I. - 1974 \"Classic\" Mako 20\' - Suzuki 2006 DF150 - Fly & Light Tackle, C&R[br]My boat: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23444#159594[br]Personal website: http://www.georgemcauliffe.com/

  • #2
    You will need to cover the coosa with glass fair and paint/gelcoat. What size do you need?
    1975 23\' Tampa,FL

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    • #3
      Excellent idea. You need to post some min. sizes that you would like.

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      • #4
        Wilson - why will I have to glass it?

        Sizes - will figure out over weekend and post what I need.
        NYC & L.I. - 1974 \"Classic\" Mako 20\' - Suzuki 2006 DF150 - Fly & Light Tackle, C&R[br]My boat: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23444#159594[br]Personal website: http://www.georgemcauliffe.com/

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        • #5
          you don't have to glass it to the boat, but you just need to wrap the material itself in glass.

          Have you ever seen or worked with the stuff? It is made to be used in composite systems, i.e. with glass.
          1975 23\' Tampa,FL

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          • #6
            Yes I would run it thru the touter table and put a Bullnose on the edges.

            [Bit might not be worth a damn when your done] and lay a piece of 4or 6oz glass on top to totally seal it. You might want to use polyester resign so it would be easy to gellcoat.

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            • #7
              Or you could run it thru the tablesaw with the blade kicked over at 45deg on all sides.

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              • #8
                Wilson - No, I've never worked with it. Was (ignorantly) assuming could just use straight up, like starboard. Drat. It really can't just sit there un-protected? What about just some epoxy paint on it?

                So are there any other materials out there that I can just glue to my transom, that will not rot, that will hold a screw, and that I don't have to spend hours prepping/glassing?
                NYC & L.I. - 1974 \"Classic\" Mako 20\' - Suzuki 2006 DF150 - Fly & Light Tackle, C&R[br]My boat: http://www.classicmako.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=23444#159594[br]Personal website: http://www.georgemcauliffe.com/

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                • #9
                  Here's something I just thought up...and should be a bit more sturdy that just using 5200.

                  Using at least 3/4" Starboard, cut and prepare the piece to be mounted to the hull. Drill one hole centered vertically on the port side and one centered vertically on the stbd side of the pad. Drill two more holes in your transom approx. 1 to 1.5" deep and large enough in diameter to accept the HEAD of a 316 stainless steel bolt or machine screw, 1/4" size at a minimum. These should match up to the holes in the pad.

                  Completely coat the inside of each hole with un-thickened epoxy. Then mix up some more epoxy and thicken it to the consistency of mayonnaise using cabosil. Using a small syringe, fill the bottom 1/4" of each hole with the thickened epoxy. Then put a light coating of un-thickened epoxy on the portion of the bolts/screws that will sit down in the hole and put one in each hole (If using machine screws, fill the gaps in each the head for the screwdriver with more epoxy prior to inserting them). Push them in far enough so that the thickened epoxy in the bottom of the hole just begins to squeeze around the head of the bolt/screw. Again using your syringe, fill the rest of the hole around the each bolt/screw with the thickened epoxy to the point where it leaves a slightly higher surface than the surrounding gelcoat. Try not to leave any air bubbles. Put a few pieces of blue masking tape over the holes to keep the epoxy until it can cure as well as keep each bolt/MS centered in the hole.

                  Once the epoxy has cured, remove the tape, and either sand down the epoxy plugs around the bolts/screws or modify your transducer pad so it will sit flush against the transom. Modification will probably only consist of opening the backside of the boltholes slightly to clean any ridges left by the epoxy.

                  Prior to putting the pad in place, drill the necessary holes for your transducer(s). On the backside of the pad, bore out those holes enough so they will accept a stainless washer and nylock nut and not protrude past the surface of the pad. Mount your transducers to the pad using stainless bolts or machine screws and then secure the pad to the boat with 316 stainless steel washers and nylock nuts.

                  This type of installation will never affect the integrity of the holes in your transom should you have to change mounting pads at some point. Just remove the two nuts holding the pad on. []

                  Good luck.
                  Brian[br]St. Leonard, MD

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                  • #10
                    Real good idea but one thing to consider - If there is any moisture at all in that transom which is not completely coversd by the epoxy then there is a chance that, through galvanic action, the SS bolt will eventually "just go away". May take 10 years or could take a little a 2 to 3 - depending on the wetness of the transom or how the bolts are covered with epoxy. Something to consider -

                    Mike
                    1973 22 CC Milford, CT USA[br]

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                    • #11
                      I'm planning a similar project, except I was planning to epoxy two fastners to a 1/4" piece of glass. Bond the glass to the transom either with 5200 or small dabs of epoxy. Then use starboard to bolt onto the glass piece, and mount the ducer to the starboard. Bit higher cost but no holes on transom.

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                      • #12
                        I was just going to drill the ducer mount holes into the transom, widen them, fill with resin, redrill the smaller mounting holes.
                        1974 20\'[br]2005 Sabalo 22\'[br]Gainesville Fl[br]

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                        • #13
                          I might have some 1/2" coosa scraps, if your still looking
                          1974 20\'[br]2005 Sabalo 22\'[br]Gainesville Fl[br]

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