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Mako 28 Goes down off of Grand isle

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  • Mako 28 Goes down off of Grand isle

    From the Coast Guard Website:

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Office of Public Affairs

    U.S. Coast Guard

    Press Release Date: June 8, 2004

    Contact: PA3 Nick Cangemi

    (504) 589-6287

    (504) 319-2229

    COAST GUARD RESCUES 5 NEAR VENICE

    NEW ORLEANS - The Coast Guard rescued five recreational fishermen Monday after the boat they were on capsized approximately 44 miles south of Venice, La.

    Rescued were: Louis Acevedo, 32, of Lafayette, La.; Morty Frederick, Sr., 45, of Jeanerette, La.; Danny King, 46, Centerville, La.; and Judson Gardner, 26, and Brian Kitchen, 47, both of Baton Rouge, La.

    The Coast Guard received two distinct emergency notifications at 6:30 p.m. Monday. The Eighth Coast Guard District command center in New Orleans picked up an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) signal, while at the same time down the road, Coast Guard Group New Orleans received a radio transmission from an employee on an offshore oil platform reporting that the 28-foot sport fishing boat Addicted To was taking on water with five people on board. A helicopter crew from Air Station New Orleans was launched and found all five people wearing life jackets, sitting on the hull of the overturned and partially submerged vessel.

    "This group of men did everything they needed to do to make the Coast Guard's job easier and their rescue a successful one," said Cmdr. Scott Kitchen, the operations officer at Air Station New Orleans. "They stayed together, they wore their life jackets, and they had an EPIRB - those things saved their lives," he said.

    The helicopter crew hoisted four of the survivors and transported them to a nearby oil platform while the rescue swimmer and remaining survivor remained on scene in a life raft from the helicopter. The helicopter crew returned to the scene after refueling at the oil platform, recovered the last survivor and rescue swimmer and dropped him off with his four counterparts on the rig.

    The Coast Guard cutter Sturgeon, homeported in Grand Isle, La., recovered the five men from the rig and delivered them to Coast Guard Station Venice, La., at about 2 a.m. today. They were reported to be in good condition.

    This rescue illustrates the importance of emergency equipment and life jackets aboard boats. The Coast Guard urges boaters to always keep this kind of equipment on their boat, and to always ensure it is in good working order prior to getting underway.

    MEDIA NOTE: Video of this rescue is available. Please contact either the U.S. Coast Guard Public Affairs office at the number above, or your local affiliate in New Orleans.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    From a local paper...

    5 men airlifted from Gulf after fishing boat capsizes

    Prepared for rescue, boaters are unhurt

    Wednesday, June 09, 2004

    West Bank bureau

    A helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station New Orleans rescued five Louisiana men Monday night from an overturned and sinking sport fishing boat 44 miles south of Venice.

    The men were airlifted to an oil rig, where they were picked up by the Coast Guard cutter Sturgeon from Grand Isle and delivered to the Coast Guard station in Venice on Tuesday about 2 a.m., Petty Officer 3rd Class Nick Cangemi said.

    The men were identified as Louis Acevedo, 32, Lafayette; Morty Frederick Sr., 45, Jeanerette; Danny King, 46, Centerville; and Judson Gardner, 26, and Brian Kitchen, 47, both of Baton Rouge. None was injured.

    When the helicopter arrived, the men, all wearing lifejackets, were sitting on the hull of the overturned and partially submerged boat, the Addicted To. The crew hoisted four of the men aboard the aircraft and took them to the oil platform.

    Because the helicopter couldn't carry all five men, a Coast Guard rescue swimmer remained with the fifth man in a life raft from the helicopter until it returned after refueling on the oil rig, Cangemi said.

    "This group of men did everything they needed to do to make the Coast Guard's job easier and their rescue a successful one," said Cmdr. Scott Kitchen, operations officer at the Coast Guard Air Station.

    "They stayed together, they wore their life jackets and they had an EPIRB," an emergency position indicating radio beacon device.

    The Coast Guard received the signal from the EPIRB at 6:30 p.m. and the helicopter got to the sinking boat at 7:19 p.m., Cangemi said.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------

    Responce from the boat's owner.

    In response to all the questions and comments about the boat sinking Monday, it was my boat so I thought I owed you a report. First let me say I have spent my entire life fishing offshore, mostly in the Bahamas where I grew up and recently in the Gulf. I have nothing but the utmost respect for the ocean and try to be prepared for anything everytime I go out. I have had a 100 ton/ 100 mile license for 23 years. I have called the Coast Guard or Bahamas Air Sea Rescue a few times over the years but never for myself or my vessel.

    My boat is/was a 1989 28' Mako. I have made numerous trips offshore in it over the past five years, many times in some pretty rough stuff. I thought it was a pretty solid boat. So I never expected the hull to crack open in 1-2' seas. I heard the crack but didn't feel anything so I don't think we hit anything. In fact, I wasn't even sure what the sound I heard was at first, but soon realized we were taking on water fast. I turned on all 4 bilge pumps (that's right, 4) but soon water was coming over the deck. I immediately grabbed my radio mike and started calling Mayday, meanwhile my crew were grabbing life jackets which were under the hard top (no way we could have gotten into the cabin in time if they had been there). The rig that helped me said once they responded they got my co-ordinates, that we were sinking, had five people on board and then the radio went under. It happened that fast. The crew cleared the boat easily as it went over. We deployed the EPIRB. Thank God the seas were calm, the water was warm and the boat stayed mostly afloat although upside down. The Coast Guard chopper got to us FAST, within an hour. We were all out of the water within an hour and 45 minutes and we were never in any real danger. It was truly a text book rescue and I have the highest regard for crew that rescued us.

    The moral of the story is, be prepared for anything offshore and don't think it can't happen to you. Invest in an EPIRB. Have a ditch bag with safety gear including flares ready to go over the side in a moment's notice and have your life jackets where you can get to them QUICK. A hand held VHF in your ditch bag comes in handy also. Many thanks again to the Coast Guard, the guys on MC-365 for their hospitality while we waited for the cutter and Trent on SP89 who relayed my distress call.
    Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

  • #2
    wow. what a story. Thank goodness it turned out ok. Sure would like to know more about the hull of that boat though. It sounds like they were able to stay with the boat when it went over so they probably got a good look at the hole in the bottom. I thought anything before 1992 was considered a higher quality vs. the 1992 to current. I guess you never know, so it's always best to be prepared.
    1978 Mako 25 - Blind Hog
    1985 Mako 20c - sold
    Fort Walton Beach, FL
    http://www.classicmako.com/forum/top...TOPIC_ID=42841

    Comment


    • #3
      I talked to these guys right before they left the dock as I was heading out in a different direction on an overnighter. It was a unique baot as I dont remember seeing many 28 mako cuddies. Glad they got home ok. I didnt realize it was the same boat until they posted they were in an old 28 mako cuddy
      Slidell, La

      Comment


      • #4
        Heard this yesterday. No idea it was a Mako. Hull split in 1-2 foot seas.....sounds weird.

        Comment


        • #5
          May not be a quality issue at all, just a catastrophic failure from years of use/pounding. It would be interesting to know what actually caused the problem and it was hull failure or hitting something.

          The first thing that came to my mind was a hard spot in the hull or even a soft spot where a rotten stringer may have been. Too much flexure over time and she split right open. Surely there was a crack developing over time, but sometimes these things are missed on inspection (which everyone should do from time to time). I have a little auto mechanics creeper that I pull myself under the trailer with and check the hull bottom out with. Naturally it would be a good idea to see the areas beneath the bunks from time to time as well.

          I do like the idea of a compartmentalized hull. Which these Makos are not... The bulkhead I placed in my bilge is the first step towards doing such a thing, but it sure would be nice if I had about 6 different sealed compartments below the deck. Maybe in my next boat.
          Slidell, LA 1993 Mako 261B - Temperance

          Comment


          • #6
            From The Captain:

            Baton Rouge, LA USA

            In response to all the questions and comments about the boat sinking Monday, it was my boat so I thought I owed you a report. First let me say I have spent my entire life fishing offshore, mostly in the Bahamas where I grew up and recently in the Gulf. I have nothing but the utmost respect for the ocean and try to be prepared for anything everytime I go out. I have had a 100 ton/ 100 mile license for 23 years. I have called the Coast Guard or Bahamas Air Sea Rescue a few times over the years but never for myself or my vessel.

            My boat is/was a 1989 28' Mako. I have made numerous trips offshore in it over the past five years, many times in some pretty rough stuff. I thought it was a pretty solid boat. So I never expected the hull to crack open in 1-2' seas. I heard the crack but didn't feel anything so I don't think we hit anything. In fact, I wasn't even sure what the sound I heard was at first, but soon realized we were taking on water fast. I turned on all 4 bilge pumps (that's right, 4) but soon water was coming over the deck. I immediately grabbed my radio mike and started calling Mayday, meanwhile my crew were grabbing life jackets which were under the hard top (no way we could have gotten into the cabin in time if they had been there). The rig that helped me said once they responded they got my co-ordinates, that we were sinking, had five people on board and then the radio went under. It happened that fast. The crew cleared the boat easily as it went over. We deployed the EPIRB. Thank God the seas were calm, the water was warm and the boat stayed mostly afloat although upside down. The Coast Guard chopper got to us FAST, within an hour. We were all out of the water within an hour and 45 minutes and we were never in any real danger. It was truly a text book rescue and I have the highest regard for crew that rescued us.

            The moral of the story is, be prepared for anything offshore and don't think it can't happen to you. Invest in an EPIRB. Have a ditch bag with safety gear including flares ready to go over the side in a moment's notice and have your life jackets where you can get to them QUICK. A hand held VHF in your ditch bag comes in handy also. Many thanks again to the Coast Guard, the guys on MC-365 for their hospitality while we waited for the cutter and Trent on SP89 who relayed my distress call.

            Comment


            • #7
              Reading this stuff makes me nervous!

              So, if I was looking to buy an Epirb or PLB, which would you chose?

              I probably would want to do something manually deployed, but what are everyone's thoughts on this?

              Tom
              Tom[br]Pompano Beach, Florida[br]1976 25\' Mako[br]

              Comment


              • #8
                Look to ACR as there products are top notch. Manually deployed 406 w/ GPS.

                http://www.acrelectronics.com/globalfix/globalfix2.html


                Comment


                • #9
                  This off of Florida Sportsman:

                  Captain:

                  Where'd the boat come from? I handled a case years ago involving a similar Mako. A marina dropped the boat in Florida and it hit at an angle, my client's insurance company lied to him in writing and told him that the engineer at Mako Marine was of the opinion there was no structural damage and made him a 2 or 300 dollar offer to fix the gel coat. The engineer, named in the letter, said he never saw the boat and wasn't stupid enough to give that opinion about hidden structural damage.

                  We were concerned about concealed stringer delamination and possible future safety issues. The insurance company paid for the boat and had to stand tall for the fraud on the client.

                  I heard later that the company sold the boat and may have again concealed the potential damage. I saw the boat in the boat trader and advised the seller of the issue. He told me the company sold him the boat, telling him it was a repo. and never mentioned the damage issue. I heard no more.

                  It was an 89 Mako with twin 225 johnsons, I think.

                  I still know the prior owner, he has a 52 Hatteras the insurance company helped him buy.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have been reading about this on several forums and the Captains description reminded me of a similar story. A buddy of mine who makes 2 or 3 trips a year to Venice was coming out of the river in his 25'Challenger when he suddenly had his tach peg out and the boat came off plane. It was a calm day so he was wide open(he's usually wide open on rough days for that matter) He shut the motor down and trimmed it up. He was amazed to find his optimax had been sheared off at the cavitation plate. He told me he didn't feel so much as a bump. He thought it was a motor problem until he looked back and saw the lower unit gone. They never figured out what he hit, but it scratched the keel a bit, tore off his garboard fitting and then got the motor. I want to say this all happened on his way out of Tiger pass, but it may have been another pass, I am not real familiar with the river. He says he is 100% sure he was in the channel, he even went back and looked at his crumb trail on the GPS and it confirmed it. That rules out the jetty, so must have been something floating.
                    1980 Mako21 [br] [br]Long Beach MS <\')))>([br]\"I can always find somebody to tow me back in, but I can never find anybody who will tow me out.........\"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I don't think we have any idea how many of those steel trailer boxes (like on the comtainer ships) that are floating around out there about 2 ft under the surface.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There is a guy I know here in Falmouth, MA who is a retire surgeon that used a 25' Whaler to make calls out on Martha's Vineyard. He was hauling along with twins on the back when he hit a partially submerged telephone pole. Both engines flipped up and slammed back down with minor damage, most of it to the skegs. (Minor stress cracks around the transom from the jolt and one bump on the bottom. He was able to make it in, luckily, without any problem.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:


                          Originally posted by warthog5


                          Look to ACR as there products are top notch. Manually deployed 406 w/ GPS.


                          http://www.acrelectronics.com/globalfix/globalfix2.html




                          Since the question was raised...

                          I was considering one of the PLB's for use in the Chesapeake. Any opinion on this one since I'm not going offshore? Other than looking at the specs, I don't see a huge difference between the two models.

                          http://www.byownerelectronics.com/st...cat=310&page=1


                          Capt Kevin ~~~><((((*>[br][br] 2520 MVSC \"Chesapeake Edition\"[br]Annapolis, Maryland[br]http://ClassicParker.com/

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